Submarine Scene In The Forbidden Room

1384 Words 6 Pages
The scene from The Forbidden Room that stood out to me the most was the in one of the submarine scenes where the guy said he need to breathe and ate a flapjack because they said earlier that there were oxygen inside the flapjacks. This film stood out to me because the submarine scene was the most intense since oxygen is really important and in the scene people were struggling for oxygen. Thus, I felt like this is the most reasonable scene and so I felt the most attached and relatable to it. So when the guy ate the flapjacks for oxygen, it was a comical and exaggerated thing to do. This contrast from the funny action in a serious scene made it memorable. I felt like the rest of the film was very bizarre and random. However, it was …show more content…
When Maddin mentioned about his relationship with his father, his work became less random because he included those father and son scenes for a reason. When I was watching, I think the scene of the son and the mustache was ridiculous because it is impossible that that will happen in real life and the father is being so irresponsible. However, after Maddin told us that he didn’t have much experience with his father, I felt sorry and empathy for him. Thus, this made the scene of the son more emotional. I thought the way Maddin views title as an element to replace what was not shot in film was very interesting because throughout the film, it had sound but sometimes there were texts on the screen to show what was happening. So I was confused to why he didn’t use voice over or sound, instead he used the text techniques used in silent films. The title really serves to fill in the holes of the stories, because they help explain what was missing and what the audience need to know to understand what was login on. Maiden’s explanation on what is too much but not too much and his editing technique which is the opposite of what they are suppose to be-cutting to make concise was also interesting to me because his film was very long especially for a film that doesn’t have a linear story. Honestly, I …show more content…
Fade-out is a cut that gradually darkens the end of a shot to black, fade-in lightens a shot from black, dissolve cut briefly superimposes the end of a shot with the beginning of another, and a wipe cut replaces shot by means of a boundary line moving across the screen. Graphic relationships are created by displaying patterns of light/dark, line/shape, volumes/depths and movement/stasis. Editors can cut from dark scenes to light scenes, while maintaining the important composition like how Hitchcock uses a center composition or when he maintained the relationships by including similar or contrasting colors like Hitchcock’s cut from Melanie to the background. Graphic relationships give mies-en-scene elements either smooth or abrupt contrast through graphic matches, continuity and movement. For example when the camera is filming flames, it is a very active shot which is contrasting to the next scene which may be of a static object. Rhythmic relations are the patterns of shots and soundtracks. Flashing frames and change in duration can stress certain elements. Sequences of flashing frames may be used in flashbacks or transitions to create a violent impact that conveys tension and excitement. Editors also use steady or accelerating shots. For example in The Birds Hitchcock counted the frames along with the rhythm of the dialogues with no fixed pattern of lengths.

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