Subaru Outback Case Study

1205 Words 5 Pages
A product doesn 't just start its life at the grocery store, car dealership, or mall — or even after you buy it. Products go on long, sophisticated journeys in order to find their consumer, sometimes taking years in the process — marketing, manufacturing, shipping, sales, and man-hours all consume time and money. One of the very important aspects of a product’s success is marketing. The marketing team decides who’s going to buy the product (in this case, it’s a Subaru Outback), but first they must conclude who their marketing base is — before it even gets to you — and sometimes, that can be a challenge. But first, or during marketing, manufacturing takes place. And manufacturing a car is no simple feat. Subaru (Parent Company: Fuji Heavy …show more content…
Cars that are manufactured in the United States have less of a distance to travel, but most of the parts that go into it must still be shipped from places like Mexico and Japan. Shipping is responsible for big costs and an environmental burden. Also, auto manufactures outside of the U.S. are also hit with a tariff tax that helps keep international manufactures compatible with domestic ones. Once a car arrives at a dealership, they are sold much different than most goods. Salespeople are in charge of informing the consumer of the car’s features in order to find the car best for the person that will be driving it. However, salespeople that are based off of a commission may work incredibly hard, and be very pushy in order to buy a car — regardless of what the customer wants or …show more content…
This is perhaps one of the most important steps to a company’s success. Subaru, however, is very unique: Prior to the 90s, the company wasn 't really sure who was buying their cars, or who to market to. They saw rugged individuals who love the outdoors, doctors, engineers, families, and lesbians — an identity crisis ensued. Most car companies have a wide range of people buying their cars, Subaru was different: Sales were stagnant, and the company was panicked — something had to be done. Subaru hired a marketing expert to study the best marketing strategies (“How A Revolutionary Ad Campaign Helped To Turn Around Subaru,” King). The U.S. headquarters is located in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. After months of campaigning, sales started to pick up, and identity started to become

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