Student Loans By Robert Applebaum Analysis

In the essay “Student Loans: Should some indebtedness be forgiven” by Robert Applebaum, the author argues that, like the essays name indicates, because the financial burden that student loans have become, after some reasonable repayment period, legislation should forgive excessive student loans. Applebaum points out that education should be a right and not a commodity. He points out that Americans are overpaying for their education and that there is no connection between the salary expected to be paid upon graduation and the tuition paid. He supports this statement by bringing to light that every other industrialized country has already figured out how to pay for higher education for its citizens. Furthermore, the author suggests that the student …show more content…
By this, he recognizes how undervalued education is in America. This perception of education as a commodity is the reason why so many Americans have student’s loans, and even worse, do not get a higher education because they are not in a position to take another loan. I believe that a society is better prepared for the future when most of its members have a higher education. I do not understand what logic people are using by thinking that education only benefits the individual that is being educated. By thinking like this, we miss the very essence of living in an interdependent society, in which what happens to one person or group affects the rest. It is a fact that changes in factors affect the course of events, from human behavior to economic activity. Applying this notion to the U.S. economics means that any change in educational conditions will affect labor market, eventually looping back to those original conditions. At the same time, education influences people’s living arrangement, finances, and health. Giving people better and higher education is in American society’s, in its whole, better interest in …show more content…
Why the right to bear arms is a right protected by the US Constitution and not education is beyond my comprehension. How incongruous is that? Even though the U.N. in its “Universal Declaration of Human Rights”, article 26, mentions that everyone has the right to education, the U.S. Constitution does not mention education, and to make things worse, the Supreme Court, 40 years ago (1973, San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez), concluded that education is not a fundamental right under it. Rights are rights regardless of the government recognizing them or not. That is why nobody can give women the right to vote, but just constitutionally recognized it and protect it. The same principle to African Americans born in this country, they are and, since the beginning of times, have always been born free like any other human being born in the world. The 13th amendment just recognizes and protects that intrinsic human right. Nobody can give you what it is already yours. Because of this, I strongly believe that the U.S. should recognize and protect the right of its citizens to equal, free, and high-quality

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