Strong Culture In The Workplace: A Case Study

1032 Words 4 Pages
Firstly, strong culture acts as ‘social glue’ bonding employees together. Richard Perrin once said, “organisational culture is the sum of values and rituals that serve as ‘glue’ to integrate the members of the organisation” (Watkins, 2013). A strong positive culture allows employees to foster trust among one another, making them more passionate and dedicated towards their work in the organisation (McShane, Olekalns & Travaglione, 2013; Brown, 1998). On one hand, a strong culture reduces and precludes destructive behavior and conflicts. On the other hand, it increases employees’ focus on customers and other important constituencies (Sweeney & McFarlin, 2002). Also, when the relationship and cooperation between departments are harmonious, the …show more content…
As a result, organisations may experience a sustainable increase in productivity and performance, as it directs employees’ activities and behavior to be consistent with organisational expectations. Additionally, Saffold (1998) discovered that culture can shape organisational processes, but processes also helps to form and alter culture. For instance, organisational culture that supports high ethical standands have a very positive influence on employees behaviour. Hence, when every employee behaves accordingly, it strengthens ethical culture within the organisaion. However, recent studies have recognised that although organisational culture has an impact on firm’s performance but the relationship between employees’ behaviour and organisational culture is well understood yet. (Scott, Mannion, Davies & Marshall, 2003; Wang and Ahmed, …show more content…
At the same time, well-defined organisational culture enables new employees to interpret what is going on within the organisation by providing important context for otherwise potentially confusing events (Newstorm, 2011). In other words, sense-making allows employees to better understand orgnisational events and communicate more efficiently within one another (McShane and Glinow, 2005; Furnham & Gunter, 1993). Thus, reaching higher levels of cooprations as they share the same mentality, beliefs and

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