Stress Effects

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In today’s world, we are constantly busy, whether attending school, going to work every day, or even taking a stroll at the park; we humans are constantly feeling the pressure of stress. However, not everyone experiences the same form of stress. There are many different types of stress such as: psychical stress, mental stress, emotional stress, and much more. Just as there are many forms of stress there are even many more causes of stress. These can result from pressures at work, economic or financial pressures, marital pressures, drug or alcohol abuse, peer pressure, bullying, academic, and discrimination. Not all stress is bad, acute stress, for instance, can be beneficial. “Acute stress resulting from specific events or situations that involve …show more content…
From a psychological perspective, “stress is a state of mental or emotional strain or tension resulting from adverse or very demanding circumstances.” However, there have been many studies which show that stress is something we cannot live without. Stress is like water, we can’t survive without it. Stress can act like a stimulant; it offers us a chance to face life’s most difficult challenges. It can stimulate us to handle situations to our maximum ability. Acute stress can pressure the brain to think outside of the box and allows us to test our adaptability and …show more content…
“High-stakes learning and performance situations can increase counterproductive stress on students.” This stress results from academic pressure, peer pressure, pressure from parents to do well, as well as self-imposed pressures such as the need to succeed in extracurricular activities or ACT, SAT and other college entrance activities, among others. In addition, “most high school students are experiencing hormonal and physical changes that influence their moods, emotions and behavior”. Of these stress inducing pressures, stress resulting from academic pressure, the quantity of courses taken, varies greatly between high school and college students. Even though college coursework tends to involve more independent study with less teacher guidance, high school work is more regimented. The average high school student takes seven classes a day. These classes tend to be preassigned classes with preassigned teachers. Many college student, on the other hand, will take a maximum of five or six classes each semester, however, unlike high school students, a college student generally has a wider selection of required courses to choose from, a large pool of teachers, and more electives choices. In essence college students are more free to choose their course work and are more involved in planning their curriculum, at their own pace, than do high school students. College students have the

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