Strengths Of Feminism

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Feminism is a conflict theory and a combination of social, political and cultural movements that is concerned with the discrimination against women and gender inequalities. The ‘waves’ of feminism refer to the feminist activity in a certain time period. The first wave emerged in the mid-19th century to early 20th century. Basic women rights such as the right to vote were the main focus. Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928) was the supporter of the women’s suffrage movement when it emerged in Great Britain. Then in 1903 she founded the new organisation of the Women’s Social and Political Union. Both movements were fighting for women’s equal rights including the right to vote. By 1928, all women over 21 had the right to vote (BBC History, no date). …show more content…
It celebrates women’s empowerment and their achievements that are to do with gender equality. There have been significant changes in women’s employment as now women are now ‘breaking the glass ceiling’. This signifies females breaking through and invisible barrier that kept them from pursuing high level professional and managerial jobs. In recent years there has been an increase in the proportion of women occupying the role of a head teacher at schools. These female head teachers can be positive role models to the female pupils; showing them to strive for their goals instead of growing up and becoming a housewife. Girls and young women are changing their ambitions due to the feminist movement. Sue Sharpe (1976) conducted a study and researched the attitudes of girls towards their ambitions in London schools. In 1976, the results of her content analysis showed that the girls were focused on marriage and motherhood once they had finished school. One female pupil stated that ‘I think men should [have careers]. If they [girls] want to they can, but I think it suits men really’ (Sharpe, 1976, p.132). Sharpe revisited the schools in the 1994 and used the same methods of research. She found that the majority of the girls’ ambitions have changed. Their main priorities were education and pursuing a career so they can be financially independent. Feminism has contributed to the change in the family. The nuclear family is less popular now in society and more diverse types have appeared such as single parent, same sex, step and adopted families. Women may take the role as the main wage earner of the family whilst the husband may want to become a ‘stay-at-home-dad’ (SAHD). According to BBC News UK (2014), there are 230,000 SAHDs in the UK approximately and rising. Feminism recognises that sociology is ‘malestream’. Oakley, 1972, cited in Osborne, 2010, offered two explanations of this statement. The first explanation is

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