Strengths And Weaknesses Of The Rational Decision Making Model

1828 Words 7 Pages
Peters, Finucane, MacGregor, & Slovic, (2000) refer to decision making as choosing between a range of options or alternatives. In saying this, decision making can be undertaken in a variety of ways, the subject this essay will be focusing on, is the rational decision making model (RDM). Meeker (1980) suggests that the rational decision making model analyzes human behavior in terms of rewards and costs. The model compromises of eight sections, each section has an important role in the overall decision process. In identifying and defining these elements of the rational decision making model, assumptions associated with the rational decision making model, and also, the term bounded rationality will be clearly identified and defined. Afterwards, …show more content…
Rahman and de Feis (2009) state that some of the weaknesses that the rational decision making model include, ambiguity, and ignorance of political factors; these then can be applied to planning For example, if an organisation asks the question ‘How can the organization make the most profit out of surplus goods?’, there is ambiguity as to what an organization is capable of doing, and what the organization is allowed to do. Under these circumstances, the organization is capable of making maximum profit, however due to political protection policies, it is not allowed to do it via dumping (Service, A 2015). Therefore the RDM has failed to provide an effective plan due to the lack of consideration for political factors. In addition to weaknesses, the rational decision making model possesses a number of strengths when applied to planning. Some of these strengths includes the outlining of the best possible plan. For example, in answering the previous question, if an organization needs a plan to make the most amount of profit no matter the consequence, following the rational decision making process will do exactly …show more content…
All though Beijerse (1999) is correct, leading also involves the influencing of others in order achieve those organizational goals. Therefore, problems typically revolve around what leaders are doing and how they are doing them. Generally a decision maker seeks to answer these problems like many other problems, that is, to achieve optimal results. Advantageously for leaders, the rational decision making model uses eights stages to seperate problems down into constituents. However, doing this can lead to the unrecognition of sociological and psychological factors of the human resources involved. Even though this poses a large range of weaknesses, strengths are still evident. Secondly, even if the leaders are of high quality, implantation of the alternatives requires succinct monitoring and controlling in order to be completely effective (Brinckloe and Coughlin 1977).

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