Psychology Strengths And Weaknesses

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From its humble beginnings to the massive, multidiscipline field that it is now, psychology has had to fight for the right to be called a science. Psychology is not only the study of human behavior, but also the study of cognitive processes, mental functioning, personality, human development, physiology of the brain, and abnormal psychological disorders. The field of psychology was created by the merging of two disciplines, philosophy and science (Wertheimer, 2012). According to Wetheimer (2012), “ the tributaries of the river of science were physiology, biology, an atomistic approach, an emphasis on quantification, and the establishment of research and training laboratories; the tributaries of the river of philosophy were critical empiricism, …show more content…
The scientific methods allows researchers to formulate questions and theories that are relevant to humanity and may potentially solve some of its mysteries. This is vital because as long as questions can be formulated and individuals constant crave answers, there is unlimited potential to the answers, experiments, and advancements that can be made. Not only can hypotheses be formulated, but the scientific method also allows researchers and scientists to conduct experiments and organized observations to test their hypotheses; through these experiments they can be either proven or disproven. Another strength is that the scientific methods does not just use generalizations and untested ideologies, instead all its claims are supported and validated through empirical research and data. Thirdly, out of the other options, the scientific method produces the least opportunity for research bias or personal opinions to be included in its claims and data, providing objectivity instead. Lastly, the scientific methods allows opportunities for the data is produces to be replicated by others and verified through new experiments; therefore, science evolves and changes, as new data and new observations are constantly …show more content…
Unlike in other sources of epistemic knowledge such as, experience, the scientific does not see the value in one personal experiences or one’s worldview. While personal experience cannot be supported and validated through empirical research, it adds invaluable knowledge and information that helps to understand humanity and human behavior. Personal experience helps to deter one’s susceptibility to addiction, one’s recovery from addition, how one deals with stress, how one thrives in the face of obstacles and etc. All of which cannot be predicted through numbers or through the use of empirical research. Another weakness of the scientific method is that it neglects the role of faith and spirituality in the understanding of human beings. Humanity was created as spiritual beings, as our innate need and desire to have relationship with God. “And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul” (Gen 2:7, King James Version). Spirituality largely impacts the people that each individual becomes, not to mention that it enables psychologists to fully understand humanity. While the scripture cannot not be validated and verified through empirical research, it adds immeasurable knowledge in helping to understanding humanity, the purpose of creation, and

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