Strengths And Weaknesses Of Nazi Ideology

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Register to read the introduction… The Nazis would use propaganda to harass the Jewish or other ethnic minorities which were categorized as lower classed races. They would blame them for the economic and financial troubles, the loss of the Great War, and for the communist threat against Nazi Germany. The propaganda worked so well that most Germans at that time held it for a correct idea to have a pure Germany, unconsciously allowing the Nazi party to slaughter ~6 million Jews and other ethnic groups which didn’t fit the characteristics of a “perfect …show more content…
The greatest weakness was most likely the abolishment of the Democracy in Germany at that time. When Adolf Hitler became chancellor in 1933, he instantly thought about consolidating his power. He used the enabling act to crown himself dictator and forbid the creation of other new parties, which made Nazi Germany a “one party” state. Citizens of Germany could not vote or speak freely. This meant the end of Democracy. All the given rights during the Weimar republic were lost. The biggest strength was that the Nazis helped germany out of its financial difficulties and restored the nations pride. However, the weakness rose over the strength and led to a Second World War and the forever lasting defeat of the Nazi Party.

Works cited

* Walsh, Ben. “Nazi Control Of Germany.” Modern world history. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. 160-175. Print.

* “Nazi Ideology.” http://www.nazism.net. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Feb. 2012. <http://www.nazism.net/about/nazi_ideology/>.

* “Nazi Foreign Policy 1933-1939.” http://hsc.csu.edu.au. Charles Sturt University, n.d. Web. 23 Feb. 2012. <http://hsc.csu.edu.au/modern_history/national_studies/germany/4024/nazi.htm>.

* “VICTIMS OF THE NAZI ERA: NAZI RACIAL IDEOLOGY.” United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2012. <http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007457>.

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[ 1 ]. Walsh, Ben. “Nazi Control Of Germany.” Modern world history. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. 160-175.

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