Homeless Crisis In Los Angeles

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Los Angeles is well known for its overpopulation, tall structures and ideal weather. It is portrayed as an ideal place to live. An issue that is often over looked and ignored is the homeless crisis in Los Angeles. In a 2015 Los Angeles Times article, “How Los Angeles’ homeless crisis got so bad” Shelby Grad and Gale Holland, question the severity of the homeless crisis through various questions. For instance, “Is the homeless population really increasing?”, “Why is this happening?”, and “Is there a cycle of homelessness among the working poor?” are amongst some question discussed in the article. The most crucial question discussed in the article is, “How did L.A’s homeless problem got so bad?” Los Angeles had to declare a state of emergency …show more content…
This group of people are usually label poor by society and have extensively been stigmatized and blamed for their own circumstance. So, if you were to ask a non- homeless, why homeless problem in Los Angeles got so bad? They would probably say it’s because they don’t work hard enough. This has long been the stigma of many non-homeless individuals in society. Although, many people may believe homeless people are lazy and unmotivated to work they are other factors that contribute to why homelessness is occurring. In the article, “How Los Angeles’ homeless crisis got so bad”, Grad and Holland state, “Experts blame soaring rents, low wages and stubbornly high unemployment. They point to gentrification downtown and in Venice, where cheap hotel rooms, motels and single-room apartments -- once the last refuge of the poor -- are being eliminated.” These are vital components that illustrates the increase in homelessness in Los Angeles has, “jumped 12% in the last two years in both the city and county of Los Angeles. The number of tents, makeshift encampments and vehicles occupied by homeless people soared 85%, to 9,535, according to biennial figures from the Los Angeles Homeless Services …show more content…
Homelessness continues to be an issue in Los Angeles with various factors. Which, lead, “The city 's affordable housing fund, which in 2008 totaled $108 million, plunged to $26 million in 2014. Officials are now trying to provide more money, but political backing to build housing throughout the county has been a struggle.” In many ways, our own misconceptions about the causes of homelessness can lead to the preconceptions that set the population who is homeless apart from us. Thus, becoming a process of stigmatization leading to stereotyping homeless people who are general mentally ill or suffering from addiction. These negative attitudes are unjustly made generalizations that contribute to a cycle of

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