Gender Stereotypes In The Movie Legally Blonde

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Legally Blonde (Kidney, Platt & Luketic, 2001) follows a young woman, Elle Woods as she tries to win her boyfriend back. When we meet Elle, she is a sorority girl who recently graduated with a 4.0 QCA in fashion. She believes her boyfriend; Warner Huntington III is going to purpose. Unfortunately, he breaks up with her as he doesn’t think she is appropriate for his lifestyle when he’s tries to pursue his political goals. In order to try and prove to Warner she is intelligent enough, she enrols in Harvard law school. It doesn’t begin well, as Elle does not fit in with her class mates. While there Elle learns that not only does Warner have a girlfriend, but a fiancé. As Elle tries to work hard at her degree she is deemed stupid and an outcast. …show more content…
Often stereotypes are derogatory and stop us from making fair judgements of new people we meet. Stereotyping goes under the term of social group schemas. As schemas are a cluster of ideas or a cluster of information that we have of something, stereotypes are simply a cluster of information we already have about a group of people in society (Hogg & Vaughan, 2014). In the movie both gender stereotyping and socio-economic stereotyping can be seen. Socio-economic stereotyping refers to judgments made about a group of people regarding their wealth, education and job. Gender stereotyping is judgements made on someone due to whether they are male or female. In 2016, Song, Zuo and Yan looked at the effect of gender stereotypes in maths and how it affects student’s performance in the subject. They found that the stereotype that men are better at maths than women did in fact effect the girl’s performance in the subject. The girls with a stronger gender stereotype had a poorer performance in maths due to the lack of belief that they could successfully pass the subject. This, however did not affect the male students in the …show more content…
When you are trying to figure out who you want to be, you compare the person you are to the person you want to be. Festinger (1954) developed the social comparison theory, which allows people to know if they are smart, creative or kind. Not only do we learn about ourselves from self-examination but we also learn about ourselves when we compare ourselves to others. By comparing how we act and what we believe in with others, we can learn the way to act socially and how we should think in that social context (Hogg & Vaughan, 2014). When comparing ourselves to others we like to compare ourselves to people who are worse off than us, this is called downward social comparisons. While upwards social comparisons are when we compare ourselves to people who are better off than us. These can both effect how we look at ourselves in both a positive and negative way. A study looking at the way in which people compare themselves to their friends on Facebook and how it effects their emotions (Liu, Li, Carcioppolo & North, 2016). This study found that social comparison did effect peoples’ emotions. It concluded that people with high self-esteem were happier with positive information than negative information when the information was from close friends. When the information was from distant friends the opposite

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