Women Stereotypes

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It is no secret that there are multiple differences between both genders. Not only are there physical differences but psychological differences, as well. The way that men and women view themselves is largely influenced by the social world they are surrounded by. Men and women each have their own stereotypes created by society and those stereotypes may sometimes influence their life. The influence that the social world has on an individual’s self concept can differentiate the self concept of men and women. Continuous exposure to stereotypes, being evaluated according to stereotypic beliefs, and occasionally behaving consistently with stereotypes leads to an incorporation of these stereotypes into the self (Casper, 2012). Stereotypes about the …show more content…
For men, an activation of stereotypes is sensitive to the current situation (Casper, 2012). Stereotypes are typically used by men to “regulate their current behavior in line with gender-specific situational affordances and expectations” instead of “providing information about themselves and what kind of person they are in general” (Casper, 2012). For women, though, stereotypes become activated in a global manner. Self-stereotyping for women is mainly urged by “by social categorization processes and global threat to their self-esteem” instead of “reflecting a response to specific situational requirements” (Casper, …show more content…
Due to the different behavior styles, boys tend to play with other boys while girls tend to play with other girls. Sigelman (2013) also found in his study that gender differences are more pronounced in same-gender situations than in mixed-gender ones. Contrary to when boys talk to other boys, when conversing with girls they talk more about their abilities and similarities between themselves and the girl (Sigelman, 2013). It seems that they tend to adopt a more feminine style of communication when talking to females (Sigelman, 2013). When girls speak to boys, unlike when speaking to other girls, they are more likely to comment on conduct and less likely to discuss activities and possessions or make descriptive comments (Sigelman,

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