Stereotypes Of Residential Segregation

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Fitzgerald (2014) describes residential segregation as urban areas that are disproportionally composed of people of color while suburban and rural areas are almost all white. Factors that contribute to the ongoing residential segregation in our society include socioeconomic status, prejudice of minority groups, and housing discrimination. Although the socioeconomic status of individuals is a factor that determines where these people will live, black homeowners are still less likely to live in the same neighborhood as white homeowners. With this being said, racial residential segregation from whites has not declined even as African Americans have gained economic status in today’s society. Residential segregation is a way to separate minority …show more content…
Neighborhoods with high concentrations of black residents and high levels of poverty are associated with having high levels of crime, even if these neighborhoods have very low levels of crime. Landlords in areas with high concentration of racial minorities have been pressured by law enforcement officials to screen their tenants carefully in order to reduce liability and maintain a safe property, but landlords in areas with higher levels of poverty have fewer potential tenants, therefore forcing them to lessen their credentials during the screening process. This allows individuals who have been previously incarcerated to reside in these neighborhoods after their release back into society. Formerly incarcerated blacks are most likely to reenter society by moving into an urban, segregated neighborhood and their presence in these areas negatively stigmatizes the entire neighborhood as being unsafe (Smith, …show more content…
Although this definition doesn’t account for the race of the current residents, a majority of those who are being displaced are people of color (Kirkland, 2008). Gentrification may create new housing for some, but it creates new forms of inequality for the previous residents of gentrified areas. As the middle class and affluent move into these neighborhoods, the poor must go somewhere else (Smith, 2012). Many landlords raise the rent, making the current tenants of a building unable to stay there, and an increase of white people in these once impoverished neighborhoods leads to them receiving special treatment over tenants who are people of color (Kirkland, 2008). Along with whites being given special treatment, residents of color are disadvantaged by racial profiling from law enforcement officials keeping a close eye on the newly gentrified area (Smith, 2012). A majority of African Americans who continue to live in gentrified neighborhoods were already tenants before the gentrification process took place. In the year 2000, blacks were twice as likely as whites to be rejected from moving into gentrified areas. The increase of African Americans in other neighborhoods is due to this

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