Stereotypes In The Classroom Interview

1382 Words 6 Pages
I conducted my interview with a student at Longwood named Michael. He is currently a junior and has been here since he was a freshman. This interview was particularly easy, mostly because I expected his answers to be different as a man of color. While I realize that diversity is not prevalent in most areas the way it is in others, I feel that Michael and I had an extremely similar experience while growing up. I found that this interview surprised me because as a Caucasian woman, I did not expect a man, regardless of ethnicity to go through the same experiences. I believe that learning about one’s self is one of the most interesting and important things that we as humans can do. However, this is not implemented in our classroom curriculum. …show more content…
While a stigma is a negative connotation, I believe that it falls under the umbrella of stereotypes. I also believe that stereotypes only run as deeply as they do if you let them. In my almost twenty years of life, I have noticed how absolutely ridiculous stereotypes can be. Somehow people have associated skin color with not having a father, skin color to determine how much money someone has, gender and what your favorite hobbies are. Stereotypes have formed the way in which individuals view people. Michael was almost stereotyped by his peers. But, due to his racial ambiguity, people were unsure of how to appropriately treat or judge him. I find this more disturbing than anything else, because his race is not easily identifiable, but most people would assume Hispanic. Falling into the trap of stereotypes not only blinds a person of what they are missing in someone, but hurts the individual who they are simply assuming characteristics …show more content…
There is no segregation, there is no separation and there is no lawful procedure in place that specifically says you can judge someone based on the color of their skin. Despite how far we have come, race remains an issue to this day. Individuals are not born hating anybody- it is taught, and more than not, it is passed down to the next generation. Being raised in the town I was, I observed a disgusting amount of racism. Personally, my family is diverse and I never found the need to judge someone based on the pigment of their skin. A man who is blatantly racist is our president elect, hate crimes still occur and people are turning a blind eye to those in need. It is terrifying to live in a world where someone is scared to be anything but a white male. Michael has been treated differently his whole life due to his race, specifically, that many people were not entirely sure of his race. He is a Jamaican-Native American but it is widely assumed that he is Hispanic. He described himself as “extremely well-dressed and well spoken. But he has proficient knowledge and experience living in low-income housing.” People assume that he is well-off and immediately expect him to act a certain way, but due to his culture and race, he appears different than what is socially expected of him. I have found that social expectations and stereotypes are directly related and I hope one day this is no longer the

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