Stereotypes In Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun

791 Words 4 Pages
In a world so transfixed on the color of someone’s skin one can not help but be loss among the troubling affects that this american psyche places on them. Lorraine Hansberry figured out the mindset early and began to challenge societies view on stereotypes. By doing so she created a worldwide phenomena that has been critically and socially acclaimed by generations of people. Her raw and omniscient view of a struggling lower class family is completely realistic and relatable no matter what color of skin the audience is. People are so intrigued to learn about the troubles of other people and then compare their situations to make them feel better about themselves, but in A Raisin In The Sun audiences get to see not only the troubles of an average …show more content…
Though simple in plot, the themes in this drama are profound and share the stage limelight just as much as the main characters. In the story there is the mama and her two kids Walter Lee and Bennie, and Walter’s wife Ruth, and their kid Travis. Each have their own dream and goal that they want achieved but struggle due to the circumstances they 're living at the moment. Walter Lee wants to invest in a liquor store to bring revenue and profit home. Bennie wants to go to medical school and become a doctor. Ruth wants to be anywhere but where she is. And the mama wants a new home. All of these dreams seem reasonable but aren 't achievable because of their financial standing. This all changes once the family learns about the $10,000 insurance check that is coming to the mama. Each one of the family members get super anxious and excited about thinking how the money will benefit them. At that point and for throughout the rest of the story, audience get to witness the harmful repercussions of one trying to accomplish their own selfish …show more content…
In the article Atkinson states “You might, in fact, regard A Raisin in the Sun as a negro The Cherry Orchard. Although the social scale of the characters is different, the knowledge of how character is controlled by environment is much the same, and the alternation humor and pathos is similar” It seems completely unnecessary to have the color of the actor’s skin as a subject matter in the article. Yet, as stated earlier, in those times nobody really questioned it. The only one to stand up against the color classification was the playwright herself, Lorraine Hansberry. In an article “Inventing a Fishbowl: White Supremacy and the Critical Reception of Lorraine Hansberry 's A Raisin in the Sun” by Robin Bernstein, Hansberry responds very sharply to the interviewers speculation about her so-called “Negro Play”. “Well,” Hansberry says “I hadn 't noticed the contradiction because id always been under the impression that Negros are people…one of the most sound ideas in dramatic writing is that in order to create the universal, you must pay very great attention to the specific”. Her words strong and true, the play is not about Negros it is a play about people. People who go through hardships no matter the color of their

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