Analysis Of Hip Hop Culture

Superior Essays
In the past several years there has been a massive number of cases dealing with police brutality, racial profiling and riots. If we ask ourselves how the images or stereotypes used to profile the men and women in these cases, are created. The answer can be represented by the image chosen for my essay. The image depicts various scenes from the Hip-Hop culture. This culture popular mostly within the African American Race is what I refer to as “Black Cool”. Hip-Hop culture is not only toxic but degrading to the image, minds, lifestyle, and growth of African Americans. I intend to prove this in the following paragraphs.
The “N” word is used immensely in Hip-Hop culture. It can be heard on the radio, in movies, restaurants, schools, and other various
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And the black youth is being drawn to that form “Black cool”. The men of the Hip-Hop industry usually portray the look and lifestyle of gangsters or what they call the “thug life”. Creating a smokescreen, to hide the fact that majority of today Hip-Hop artist have some form of college education. They rap about things like selling and using drugs, having sex with various women, fancy cars and clothes, and “shooting up someone’s block”. These lyrics encourage young black men to be gangsters or thugs, rather than a business man. The women of the Hip-Hoop culture such as Nicki Minaj, portray a lifestyle of promiscuity and help to promote the exploitation of women. Her lyrics and music videos encouraging young African American women to believe that unless your nails are on “fleek”, you have long hair, a big butt, and you “pop that thang for pimpin’”. You aren’t desirable, and you can’t be wealthy or successful. It is more important to have expensive shoes, cars, clothes, or the best nails and hair than it is to have a 4.0 GPA. Or to show off how much money you have, get in fights, and behave in a standoffish manner than it is to respect those around you. All of this quality and actions decrease the value of the culture. It also paints a very misleading portrait of Black America. Then you have people like Justin Bieber, who morphed …show more content…
In the year 2016, they are unable to move forward because of something that happens over one hundred years ago. Most of the men and women who use slavery as an excuse for their shortcomings, more than likely have no clue who, if anyone in their ancestry was slaves. It amazes me at how quickly fingers are point and blame is placed on everyone and thing but the aslant. They are completely blinded by the glamor of Hip-Hop culture. The people they looked to for inspiration are the same people who cripple them. The money they earn is spent trying to duplicate the lives of Hip-Hop celebrities. By buying the most by buying what they see on television, instead of investing in a better education. They kill each in gang wars, trying to emulate the lyrics of rap songs. The dream is to be like Lil Wayne, Two Chainz, Nikki Minaj, or Beyoncé and Jay Z. And to have a life like the shows Love n Hip Hop, Real Housewives of Atlanta, or The Bad Girls

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