Essay On Native American Culture

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The effect the European American’s culture had on the Native Americans is still very prominent today because the stereotypical American Indian still persists both in life and literature. By erasing their languages and teaching European ways exclusively, the Native American culture has slowly disappeared. The culture has been slowly degraded by an increase of acceptance of Native American stereotypical attributes such as alcoholism, laziness, and gambling addictions among others. Indigenous people were deeply affected by European American culture and have been fighting stereotypes to rebuild the foundations of their identity that have been neglected throughout a painful history.
Often times, stereotypes can be positive, but more often than
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Just as Europeans are not all the same, there are many different aspects that make up the identity of each American Indian. Sherman Alexie points this out when a character remarks, “Do any of us know who we really are?” (9). This reference was made in response to the questioning of what tribe a man belonged to. This has become a real point in question especially in the Native American culture. Many natives were born in a culture that discouraged traditional customs and traditions in favor of the white European way of life (Fleming 55). When a culture is no longer accepted by those around them, it dies out or is forgotten by most. It is imperative that Native Americans are encouraged to remember what has been forgotten over the years to bring pride back to their …show more content…
While many natives do prosper and immerse themselves in the European American culture, there are still many who do not. The stereotypical Indian is a prominent symbol of that oppression. Many tribes are working harder than ever to bring back lost culture to their descendants in order for them to embrace it and use it to succeed in the future. Just as Jackson was able to build the bridge from the past to the future for a few brief moments with the yellow bead, there is hope that educating the next generation on the Native American culture will bridge the

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