Stereotyped Views Of Women's Gender Role In Society

1280 Words 6 Pages
Gender role in a society is often stereotyped and reflects the essence of the given culture and social structure. Certain social roles dominated by either gender, such as traditional social division of labor link to belief about gender roles (Wood & Eagly, 2010). Gender role expectations are pervasive in a society and an individual’s psyche (Firestone, Firestone, & Catlett, 2006; Plant, Hyde, Keltner, & Devine, 2000). Stereotyped views of gender often lead to defensive sexist attitudes that eventually reflected back on social values and policies. Such perspectives and expectations may or may not accurately describe either gender (Firestone & Catlett, 1999; Firestone, Firestone, & Catlett, 2006). The assigned characteristics and roles may confuse …show more content…
As the weaker sex of the two, women have been valued for roles and behaviors that accommodate powerful male gender role. Even though, it is not easy or ideal for women to maintain passive and helpless role in society, it can also serve them well in achieving goals in a socially acceptable manner. Certain helplessness and passivity encourage males to act on their role as powerful and masterful group. Such behaviors, on one hand, allow them to gain power in the society without break social norm and mores, but on the other, they can contribute to stereotype that resulting in trapping themselves as the weaker group. Such dilemma perpetuates implicit hostility and resentment that tend to be destructive in their relationship with men in their lives (Firestone, Firestone, & Catlett, …show more content…
Children learn social behaviors from observing and mimicking significant adults in their lives. Parents’ attitude towards their own sexuality as well as how they behave according to the attitude is picked up by their offspring. For instance, if a father acted aggressively and emotionally unavailable as defined by gender stereotype, his son not only perceives such behaviors as the normal male behaviors, but also experience hostility and resentment without having an examples of acts in tenderness and nurturance. Similarly, mother’s behavior significantly influences her daughter. A mother who behaves as intrusive, helpless, and passive, her daughter may not able to properly develop a sense of autonomy and independence as an adult. This dynamic is particularly problematic if the mother (consciously or pre-reflectively) tried to fulfill her unmet needs through her children (Firestone, Firestone, & Catlett,

Related Documents