Stephen Mott's Biblical Ethics And Social Change

1350 Words 6 Pages
To begin with, it won’t be that wrong to say that the idea of “ethics” or “morality” is the only thing that differentiate us (human) animals. Inasmuch as it is important to have a sound ethical system for the existence of a balanced and harmonised society, it is also no less important to acknowledge the fact that we cannot attain objective ethical values without a well defined reference point. Presuming the fallenness of creation, the ability of reason or human cognitive faculty to make ethical choices is severely marred. Therefore, reason cannot be the point of reference if we are to achieve lasting ethical values that would guide us in making sound ethical judgments. It has to come from somewhere (or someone) else that transcends reason and …show more content…
Mott argues that the basis for Christian ethics lies in the saving grace of God, and of that I couldn’t agree more. His basis can be justified in light of the central theme of the Gospel—salvation by grace through faith (Eph. 2: 8-9). The Christian theology of soteriology underscore the foundational importance of grace in understanding Christian ethics and identifying God as the source. As Mott puts it, “The priority of God’s grace to ethics, in the sense that the root is prior to the stem reflects the sovereignty of God.” In other words, love is the supreme ethic that outshines all other forms of ethics. And only God possess perfect love because He is love (1 John 4:8). Being created in the image of God, we also possess love but made imperfect and conditional through the “Fall.” In order to understand the imperfect condition of our hearts, that reflects love or hatred, we must face the reality of …show more content…
The parable has profoundly transformed our understanding of love and justice and defies reason in favor of a sacrificial love. Martin Luther King Jr. reminds us that the Samaritan did two things that we, as Christians, also ought to do when encountering someone in need and who deserves justice .i.e., to go beyond universal altruism and go the extra mile by possessing dangerous altruism and excessive altruism. The Samaritan put the interest of others before his own by risking his own safety, thereby, expressing a dangerous altruism. As if that was not enough, he also paid and promised to reimburse the extra cost that might rises in nursing the injured man when he returns. Again, reflecting his possession of an excessive altruism. Therefore, in short, the parable underscore two things in understanding Christian ethics—it redefined the idea of one’s neighbor and what it means to love our neighbor as

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