Essay On Stem Cells

1239 Words 5 Pages
Since the mid-1800’s, research contributing to the vast amount of information we know today about stem cells has broadened our horizons in the field of medicine, as well as led to several discoveries involving humanity’s origin. Although they comprise only a small portion of known stem cells, muscle stem cells are indeed equally as important to science because of their aid in helping us to gather new facts about the human body. Therefore, to completely understand how these cells affect our bodies, one must first be aware of the different types of muscles, which include skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscles. Skeletal muscle is a muscle that is connected to the skeleton, while cardiac muscle, also called myocardial, is the muscular tissue of …show more content…
Considering muscular stem cells are in close relations with your standard cells, it is important to examine what their jobs are and how they go about repairing muscle tissue. Some notable matters that should be recognized when studying stem cells are the possible diseases and disorders that may come from them being dysfunctional, as well as how scientists use them in medicine. Unlike a normal cell, stem cells have several possible, special tasks assigned to them at their time of creation, making them useful as an internal repair system for several different parts of the body, including muscles themselves. Stem cells, also called somatic cells or vegetative cells, are remarkable for the field of medicine because they are known to be some of the basic building blocks of humanity and life itself. Muscular stem cells have the ability to self-renew themselves and are capable of giving rise to new skeletal muscle cells through cell division, meaning that their “offspring” will be the product of two daughter cells with the same genetic …show more content…
For example, a disease called Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy can cause muscles to be weak, or even result in the muscular tissue progressively decaying over time. This disease is the product of satellite cells becoming exhausted and eventually losing the ability to duplicate themselves because of their great repair burden. Therefore, as the cell number becomes less and less, the muscle is unable to repair itself, leading to an excess buildup of fat cells and scar tissue that which weaken the muscle until it can no longer function effectively. This disorder affects 1 in every 3,500 boys, most of which become confined to wheelchairs by the age of 12 and, in most cases, will become progressively deformed as time goes on, as well as gradual cognitive impairment. Unfortunately, most males with a case of this disease die in their early twenties, but in this the field of medicine may, over time, study and discover new ways stem cells can be used to help, or even cure, people with this

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