Philip Zimbardo's Prison Life: The Stanford Prison Experiment

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WHY WAS STANFORD’S PRISON EXPERIMENT CONDUCTED?
In order to study psychological effects of prison life a experiment was conducted called “Stanford Prison Experiment”. The psychologists wanted to study what were the psychological effects of becoming a prisoner or prison guard. To do this experiment, a team of researchers led by the famous psychology professor named, “Philip Zimbardo” finally decided to set up a replicated prison so that they can carefully note effects of the behavior of all those within the walls of prison.
“What happens when you put good people in an evil place? Does humanity win over evil, or does evil triumph? These are some of the questions we posed in this dramatic simulation of prison life conducted in the summer of 1971 at Stanford University. How we went about testing these questions and what we found may astound you. Our planned
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These boys were divided into two groups & the decision was taken by a flip of the coin. Half of them were chosen to be guards & others to be prisoners. At the start of this experiment there were no differences between boys who acted as prisoner & guards.
To closely observe the prison environment, the services of experienced consultants were taken. There was a former prisoner who had served approximately “seventeen years” behind bars. This helped us to be aware, of what were the difficulties faced by a prisoner.
CONSTRUCTION OF PRISON:
Following steps were taken to make an environment of a prison.
• It was constructed by joining each end of a corridor in the basement of “Stanford's Psychology Department” building. That corridor was labeled as "The Yard" where prisoners were allowed to walk, eat, or exercise. For going to toilet the prisoners were blindfolded so they don’t the way out of prison.

• To create the prison cells, the doors from laboratory rooms were taken off & were replaced with doors of steel

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