Standing Up For The Rights Of New Fathers By Tara Siegel Bernard

1124 Words 5 Pages
In the article “Standing Up for the Rights of New Fathers,” author Tara Siegel Bernard is writing about the controversial discussion of equal rights between genders, especially about paid paternity leave. Bernard is a personal finance reporter for The New York Times and has worked as a news editor for Consumer News and Business Channel (211). The author begins the article by introducing a father that is concerned about the amount of paternity leave that is available to him from his employer. After examining the father’s situation, the writer examines paternity leaves from other American employers, reviews the policies between mothers, biological fathers, and adoptive fathers, and questions whether or not the policies are discriminatory (Bernard …show more content…
Bernard believes biological fathers do not receive the same rights when it comes to paternity leave. The author gives an example of a father named Josh Levs. Levs filed a case against the company he works for because he feels he is not receiving equal rights compared to others (Bernard 211). At his place of employment, birth mothers and employees that adopt or have a child through a surrogate are entitled to ten weeks of paid leave while biological fathers only receive two weeks of paid leave. This leaves biological fathers like Levs with the options of hiring help or staying home for a long time without receiving pay. Neither of these options are financially reasonable for most people, and leaving a father to confront this choice at this point in a newborn’s life is preposterous. Bernard’s opinion is that it is just completely unacceptable if a father gave up his child for adoption, and some other guy adopted him or her, he would get ten weeks of paid leave to take care of the child. However, the biological father does not get ten weeks, but instead only two weeks of paid …show more content…
There has been a start of a movement that moves from just complaining about it to actually taking action. More and more employees, especially men, have started to file legal actions against their employers for workplace discrimination. Then the author writes about many people agreeing with this, even many experts in law. She addresses the opinions of some of these experts in areas related to the problem and how they view Josh Levs’ claim. Many experts feel that men like Mr. Levs are being penalized even more than women for seeking flexibility after the birth of a child, because they are stepping outside of their usual gender roles and flouting convention, some researchers found. When men take time off after the birth of a child, it can have lasting ripple effects. Bernard states, “not only does it help create a connection with the child, but it sets the stage for a more egalitarian division of labor at home over the longer term”

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