How Did Railroads Affect Society

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Back to when the railroads first established, it effected the national sense of time. Many people disliked the idea of trusting of a company, and later on being the government. There was tremundous amount of citizens who were not in favor of this system, but it became a life changing factor in our world today. Since the railroads were being constructed, which allowed a fast and resourceful way to travel great distances, the operation "required the standardization of time in zones." To begin with, citizens were not fond of the topic "time" due to many reasonings. One being that the citizens didn 't have a consent on the subject and it angered most of them. Before the Standard Time Act, people used a well-known clock that measured time by the …show more content…
This made life a lot more easier and efficient. The observation Back to when the railroads first established, it effected the national sense of time. Many people disliked the idea of trusting of a company, and later on being the government. There was tremundous amount of citizens who were not in favor of this system, but it became a life changing factor in our world today. Since the railroads were being constructed, which allowed a fast and resourceful way to travel great distances, the operation "required the standardization of time in zones." To begin with, citizens were not fond of the topic "time" due to many reasonings. One being that the citizens didn 't have a consent on the subject and it angered most of them. Before the Standard Time Act, people used a well-known clock that measured time by the position of the sun, for example a church steeple. "Let us keep our own noon!" The quote stated, also a known book created by David Horvitz, is protesting against the standardization of time. The protest and arguements were ongoing about how they wanted to keep it the same and have no change in their

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