St. Augustine Of Hippo's City Of God?

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The era that rests between the collapse of the Western Roman Empires and the established beginning of early modern European history is known as the Middle Ages because it appears to sit between two superior periods of human history. Often over looked or generalized when looking at the larger spectrum of written history, this millennia contains two of the most important developments in the history of the Europe and the development of the modern world. The history of Medieval Europe is one of two major themes that seem to be run completely through it from the 5th Century until the late 15th Century; the characteristics that are synonymous with the Medieval Era of Europe, which often surround the church or a castle of some sort, turn out to be …show more content…
Augustine of Hippo released a pair of massively influential and complex works entitled On Confessions in 397 and City of God released sometime after 426. Confessions stands as the first intellectual autobiography that subsequently creates an intellectual self-portrait of the time in which he was writing and gives an account of not just his life but also of his feelings and emotions. This allows the reader to not only see what Augustine went through in life but also to understand the larger picture of what is occurring in the time he is alive and the complexities that other people may also be facing. St. Augustine’s most complex work, City of God, is a response to the pagan accusations that the sack of Rome in 410 CE by the Visigoths and the overall decline of the Empire is attributed to the Pagan Gods punishing the city of Rome for adopting Christianity. Through reference of Adam and Eve St. Augustine argues that there are two cities, or two societies, one of which is filled with all the Christians that have lived, are living, or will ever exist, and is known as the city of God. The other is the city is that of man. Filled with mortals, the city of man cannot exist forever because it is burdened by the loss of will power among its inhabitants, and no society on earth made up of humans is anything more than that. Even the city of Rome could not escape the fate of …show more content…
Ambrose, the bishop of Milan, was tearing down an ancient tradition and in its place erecting one with the Catholic Church in its place. With an immense amount of support from the local population, the governor of Milan, St. Ambrose, was also elected as the bishop of the same city in 374 and accepted the position within a week of his baptism into the religion. In terms overall historical impact, St. Ambrose crafted the Christian Medieval concept of the emperor being the son of God and the Church and therefore subject to orders from bishops. In 390 Ambrose refused Roman Emperor Theodosius I entry into, and the right to participate in, the liturgical ceremonies in the cathedral of Milan. Punishing Theodosius I for using soldiers to suppress a riot and in the process killing thousands of civilians, Ambrose was one of the strongest early supporters of church over state. Theodosius was forced to perform public penance for what is said to have been several months, and only after he had fulfilled Ambrose’s demand, was he given the holy sacrament of Eucharist and welcomed into the church. This act by Ambrose not only humiliated Theodosius, but also established the principle that the emperor was at the beck and command of the church, solidifying the notion that allegiance of civilians should be to the church, not the state. As one of the earliest recorded examples of separation of church and

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