Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Essay

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Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is a degenerative disease of cervical spinal. The onset is usually insidious, with long periods of fixed disability and episode of worsening of events are taking place. Concerning to the pathophysiology of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, the injuries which are frequently repeated to the spinal cord are caused by static mechanical factor, dynamic mechanical factor and spinal cord ischemia. These factors are responsible for affecting the spinal cord through direct or indirect trauma and ischemia. Concerning to the diagnosis, clinical symptoms, neurological examinations, and imaging including plain radiography, computed tomography(CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important for preoperative evaluation …show more content…
Cervical spondylosis is one of the common cause of nontraumatic spondylotic myelopathy and these should be differentiated from other spinal factor in which the surgical treatment is usually the first option, So, here early surgical treatment is the important key to hinder the natural history of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and can improve the clinical outcome and neurological prognosis.

Even though, the diagnosis of CSM can be difficult because the clinical manifestation can vary widely among the individuals. Besides, Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a manifestation of neck condition that arises when the spinal cord becomes compressed or squeezed due to the wear-and-tear effect that occur in the spine as we become old. Here the spinal cord transmit nerve impulses to other regions of the body part, so that patients with CSM can sense a wide variety of clinical manifestation such as Weakness and numbness in the hands and arms, loss of balance and coordination, urinary urgency, hesitation, frequency and neck pain can all result when the normal flow of nerve impulses through the spinal cord are

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