Spinoza's View Of God

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Theology brings about different interpretations of God and the role he plays within the universe and alongside humanity. These concepts range from a God that is the same yesterday, today, and tomorrow to a God that is ever changing by the experiences of his creations as process theism describes; a God that shares a personal relationship with his creations to a God that is emotionless as Spinoza describes (Casanova, The Journal of Religion and Psychical Research, p. 49; Nadler, Humanities, p. 46). While Spinoza holds a controversial view of scripture as propagating superstitious illusions and process theism portraying God in scripture as less distinct and less powerful, Western theism being more plausible depicts the divine as “all powerful, …show more content…
46). Although process theism does not support God as a perfect being due to the fact he is growing alongside creation, he is however cable of emotion both experiencing joy and sorrow that contributes to God’s growth (Casanova, The Journal of Religion and Psychical Research, p. 49). Western theism paints an illustration of a perfect loving creator capable of feeling; however, this does not always translate to logic and reason giving off a naïve impression of will over logic and faith over reason where God is thought to be above logic and unsubstantiated reason (Peterson, et al., Reason and Religious Belief, p. 139). As God’s creation, he or she is dependent upon the divine as a guiding force and to sustain …show more content…
This implies that God is the wisest amongst all beings and is supported by Western theism where biblical scripture speaks of the events that are yet to come that will end existence on earth. Throughout scripture, events are foretold from the birth of a messiah to the salvation of God’s people. Even though God gives the power of choice to his creations, it is said that he already knows the decision he or she will make prior to making them. Perhaps that is why God is known as the God of second, third, and continuing chances. Conversely, process theism does not hold that God is all-knowing or omniscience. This is due to the fact that the choices made continually change the future, and so the future is yet unknown by God and his creations because God is unaware of what he or she will decide (Casanova, The Journal of Religion and Psychical Research, p. 49). The God of Spinoza “does not formulate plans, issue commands, have expectations, or make judgments because Nature does not exist for the sake of any end” (Nadler, Humanities, p. 46). Given this description, it’s understandable that Nature or God would not have the attribute of knowledge as known in Western theism, but simply exists and will continue to exist. There is commonality in saying God can be nothing other than what he is including the attribute of

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