Spiderman Stephen Crane Analysis

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Batman as Joker, and Spiderman as the Green Goblin. Portraying heroes as villains and the latter as heroes was his specialty. In order to make this work, Stephen Crane not only depicted both sides of a character, but also lived in his own contradictions. Following the Civil War, slaves were freed, but the minds of the people were still enslaved. Crane’s own life contradictions enabled him to publicize the idea that no one could be judged, whether it be because there are too many things going on that onlookers would not understand, or simply that judges could be gazing in a mirror. The people needed reminding: there is no righteousness or depravity, just humanity. Stephen Crane, instead of working to make clearer the line between right and wrong, blurred …show more content…
The tales, shaping colors into powerful settings, dramatic action, and omniscient characterization explored human nature and destiny (Crain). These explorations celebrated the irony of the working of the human mind, and multitudes of people bought into it. Slowly, Crane’s work came to a peak, where the citizens of America could believe that nothing is ever as it seems. The author had powerful elements of irony that likened him to Shakespeare, while showing the likeness between human and beast, making him like Jack London. However, Stephen Crane was by all means his own person. No other author before had created such an outcry for peace. None had quite forced the people out of their shell. Almost as many that tried, also failed. However, Stephen Crane made sure he was nothing like these other authors. He pushed his works of art throughout the New World, though this World be torn and battered by the many violent acts committed towards it. Reconstruction had begun, but Stephen Crane had another aspect of life to rebuild. The mind needed attending to, where the prisoners still lived, rioting and rebelling against each other. The work that needed to be done was

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