What Is Rathus Theory Of Early Education

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Spencer A. Rathus, a child developmental psychologist, argues against the concepts many supporters of early education claims are based upon. He also argues against the idea of children starting school at an earlier age and deems that pushing school entry age back will rear more positive, academically, and developmentally beneficial outcomes. He believes there needs to be a compromise of the two implementations of schooling. Rathus believes in getting children started in school only if the child’s brain has fully developed enough to handle the education and information they will be receiving. Moreover, he encourages starting children in school at a usual time if the school they attend is play-based, which means the school aids in developing …show more content…
He claims that when “schools establish reasonable and appropriate expectations of children’s capabilities when they enter school” this is a way in which, children become better prepared. Rathus states that this is due to a child’s self-fulfilling prophecy which is to do as the teacher expects from them. This means that if a teacher has higher goals for their students they will be inclined to do better because they believe that their teacher believes they can. Rathus states that the older the child, the more likely teacher will have higher expectations for them to achieve at a higher level (228). Rathus believes that when children enter school at an older age, they have pre-developed or developing self-control and self-help skills which will translate well into these children’s ability to focus on their studies and maintain a healthy perception of school (226). Rathus’s studies show that in the long-term outcomes, that a later school entry age generally improves a child’s ability to do well in school because a child believes they have to ability to do …show more content…
In a research study conducted by Erdal Kucuker, he states that from a study analysis its was concluded “that the children who started school when [they were] 73-84 months old were more successful than those 60-66 months old” and he found that these children with a later start period did significantly better than children who began an academic based school earlier (46). Psychologists Huang and Invernizzi, who practice psychology at the University of Virginia, found in their statistical analysis study that after following “405 students from the beginning of kindergarten until the end of Grade 2” that the outcomes showed that children, who were younger, “scored lower than their oldest peers at the beginning of kindergarten on various early literacy measures” (431). Developmental psychology research shows that children who start school later are able to develop more self-creativity and unstructured play, which is critical for children. Those who want children to start school later look at the benefits, in terms of intelligence, these children will have and the easier it will be and more likely they will succeed in school. Also, these people believe it is beneficial for these children to express their creativity in terms of play, develop their bodies, and learn what they can and cannot do with them. Nevertheless, it has

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