Spanish Evangelization Analysis

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Throughout the 16th century, the Spaniards established the foundation of colonial society as they ventured throughout the New World. These efforts were not free of conflict and tensions. The Spanish imposed specific customs and practices on indigenous groups. In areas such as Mexico and Peru, indigenous people had to adapt to these Spanish ideas and values, including religious beliefs, sometimes voluntarily, however, most of the time it was forced upon the natives. Religion and evangelization practices had the most profound effects on the indigenous natives of the New World. This paper will analyze and discuss the effects of the evangelization practices of the indigenous people of the New World and the problems it erupted.
In 1493, a year
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Kathryn Burns in “Gender and the Politics of Mestizaje,” discussed how Spanish cloisters/ women monasteries were established and set up in Cuzco, Peru for mestiza Andean women. Burns argues about the Santa Clara monastery and its earliest entrants were vital to the production and reproduction of Spanish hegemony in Cuzco, Peru. This was helping remake the former capital of the Incas into a center of Spanish colonialism (Burns 8). By imposing this type of institution in the city of Cuzco, this was a way to assimilate Mestiza Andean women to practice Spanish customs and manners. Once these Andean women were taught Spanish values and the Catholic religion, they will be able to pass it on to their future children and future generations to come. It produced a Spanish culture and maintained the Spanish culture in Peru. This was one of the ways the missionaries kept control of the indigenous women of Peru. Women were seen as the future child producers, whose future children would one day inhabit Peru. So it was very important for the Spanish and missionaries to convert the women to the Catholic religion and teach them Spanish practices and ideas so they could pass them on in the

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