Comparing The National Sorry Day And The Stolen Generations

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the goal of assimilation. The general public was not accepting of Indigenous people in their society and Indigenous people, even children, were resistant to abandoning their culture. While removals stopped by the early 1970s, it was not until the 1980s that policy changes were made and there was a reappraisal on how to handle both issues of assimilation and child welfare (Sorry Day and The Stolen Generations, 2015).
The report further detailed instances of abuse post-removal. Many boys were referred to as “inmates” or by their identification numbers in their new homes. Children attempted to run away and many were placed in solitary confinement for acting out, not following rules, or attempting to run away. After a certain age children were
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The day became a time for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians to commemorate and remember the significance of the Stolen Generations and for non-Indigenous Australians to move towards reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. National Sorry Day included activities to honor both the Indigenous culture as well as the atrocities perpetrated against the Stolen Generations. Sorry Books were issued as a way for Indigenous people directly impacted by the removal of children to share their stories. The books became a vital tool in the emotional healing of Indigenous communities. By sharing their stories in the books they were allowed to publicly acknowledge their suffering and share the power with the Australian government. Non-Indigenous people were also encouraged to share their personal apologies with Indigenous people (Sorry Day and the Stolen Generation, …show more content…
Decades before the Bringing Them Home report was released, history debates – known as history wars – served as a center for debate among conservative and liberal Australian politicians and academics. History serves as a vital piece of identity, with populations taken on characteristics and forming memories about their identity that have been passed on through history. The history wars in Australia have proven to compromise the identity of Indigenous Australians and White Australians alike. Notably, the wars have further placed Indigenous Australians in a place of victimhood as atrocities perpetrated against them have been completely denied (Gunstone,

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