Racism In Sons Of Mississippi

1549 Words 6 Pages
How should one relive history? For many, the greatest moments in history were the most excruciating to relive while others reveled in the moment to tell you about their past. At least until questioned about his or her barbaric actions towards another human being. Dating back to the 1800’s, Mississippi has been the most consistent at reliving and recreating racism and its history. Whether this is by happenstance or by the utter hatred of those who are born and bred in good ole sovereign Mississippi. During one of the most life-changing movements in our history; the Civil Rights movement, where integration and segregation were equally important to both White Americans and African-Americans, Sons of Mississippi shines a light on an era thick with …show more content…
The photo was taken under a tree located in the Grove, an area where students gather between classes or just to simply hang out. The virulent hatred that white Southerners were not ashamed to show or discuss is not only captured in one moment during the civil rights era but also documented by various media stations over the course of ten days on the lawns of the University of Mississippi. Sheriff William T. Ferrell, one of the seven men that look to be prepping for racial thuggery is the man gleefully grasping the billy club says, “I was smoking a cigarette and I put it between my teeth and I took hold of the billy and I said, ‘Goddamn, it’s big as a baseball bat,’” (27) and the moment captured behind the lens has never died. Sheriff James Ira Grimsley, Pascagoula’s drunken hero also appears in this picture wearing a Stetson hat and glasses that seem embedded atop his bulbous nose. He, in a drunken rage and his busload of deputized bandits set out towards Ole Miss to take part in a riot brought on by the integration of the University of Mississippi by James …show more content…
This flag is also called the rebel flag, the Dixie flag and the Southern Cross replacing the old Magnolia flag. The stigma that has been attached to the fabric of its existence has left more than Mississippians full of heartfelt pain, but anywhere the flag is waved its only symbolic representation to the African-American population is hatred. The night before all the chaos struck, “Ross Barnett…stood at the fifty-yard line as the world’s largest Confederate flag was unfurled.” (150) Ole Miss is known for its school mascot, Colonel Rebel, representing the old south running about entertaining his fans with his trusty blanket of racism. The University of Mississippi considered Colonel Reb a representation of a southern gentleman and has been its rallying symbol since 1937. He has, however, been replaced with the Rebel Black Bear and one can still not feel the racism behind that. As the University of Mississippi in 2015 reluctantly let down their flag the truth still stands, “Those rebel flags in every hand might well have been swastikas,” (150) and although the flag no longer waves at Ole Miss its heritage is still strong in. Try as they may, our beloved state continues to fall short, “the human heart in conflict with itself. That’s Mississippi.” (173) “Ahead in Mississippi was the reemergence of the Klan,” (173) White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, another symbolic image of wonderful

Related Documents