Sonnet 29 Poetry Analysis

Over the 16th and 17th centuries following the Italian Renaissance, literature in England began to flourish. Some of the most prominent writers were of this era, such as William Shakespeare, Edmund Spenser, John Donne and Robert Herrick. Together, along with additional writers they composed one of history’s most significant poetic movements. Movements that have been fundamental to change the course of poetry in and out of their eras. All throughout history, poets have emerged to exhibit their profundity in poetic expression. Writers often use poetry as a way to express their feelings or to escape the logical. The variability in poetic expression over the course of history are remarkable. It is important to make connections between poetic periods …show more content…
However, the theme of love dominates all the themes expressed and is confirmed line after line. In this sonnet, love is a power. A power that is well able to bring optimism and hope to one in solitude and disgrace. The first couplet captures Shakespeare’s feelings, “When, in disgrace with Fortune and men’s eyes, / I all alone beweep my outcast state”, (1174). The first two quatrains are lamentations, to some extent. He is wishing he was more wealth or socially superior, and he is even jealous of another man’s opportunity. The final couplet is a complete contrast in tone. The character is more optimistic and drawn out of his depression by a thought of his beloved. The author says “For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings”, (1174). Attributing to the idea that their love is genuine and it only takes the thought of his love to suddenly change the character’s emotional state to one of happiness. This is highlighting the healing power give life to one’s …show more content…
It is a metaphor for a kind of purity and innocence. He urges the acceptance for young females to “Gather ye rosebuds while ye may”, (1762). Referring to the rosebud as the young female’s beauty. Herrick goes on to say “And this same flower that smiles today / Tomorrow will be dying”, (1762). The idea is that their beauty should be used as much as possible as with time, it fades away. In the fourth stanza of the poem, Herrick is not morally putting on distinction between sex and fornication within the confines of marriage instead; he proposes marriage as an alternative to sexual offence and sexual withholding. Herrick’s work embodies the theme of love in physical attributions and interactions. He takes out the gentleness of love as portrayed by Shakespeare and Spenser. Herrick’s work seems to mimic society at that

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