Sonnet 130: My Mistress Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun

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William Shakespeare had a way with words, unlike any other person that stepped foot on this earth. He is known for creating a lot of the words that we still use today. This helped Shakespeare when expressing his love since he would often express his love through his writings. One can see examples of this in “Sonnet 18: Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day” and “Sonnet 130: My Mistress’ Eyes Are Nothing Like the Sun.” As one can tell from the titles, these are drastically different poems. Just by analyzing the titles, one can assess that Sonnet 18 seems positive while Sonnet 130 seems negative. This is because the first 126 Sonnets were speaking of a “Fair Youth,” and Sonnets 127-152 are speaking of a “Dark Lady” (Dautch). Although Sonnet 18 and 130 have the same theme of love, William Shakespeare portrays love, through his use of imagery, in two different ways.
First, the two poems share the same theme; however, they are portrayed differently. The theme of both poems is love, but this is easily seen in Sonnet 18. Sonnet 18 says, “Thou art more lovely and more temperate,” through this Shakespeare is saying that his love is more beautiful than any summer day. In this poem,
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Sonnet 130 uses beautiful imagery, but instead of being compared to these images, the muse is being contrasted from the images. Every time Shakespeare uses an image of something blissful, he tells how his lover could not compare to it. For example, Shakespeare speaks of perfumes and how marvelous they smell, and then he speaks of his muse’s breath and how repulsive is smells in comparison. The contrasting is carried throughout nearly the whole poem except for the final two lines. In the final two lines, he says how he oddly loves her, and how any woman would be considered “ugly” by using such radical comparisons. So, this poem crudely compares his muse, and concludes with how he loves her despite her

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