Solutions to Communication Problems Essays

1255 Words Feb 25th, 2016 6 Pages
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Solutions to Communication Problems
Introduction
Organizations and institutions are bound to suffer from severe communication problems from time to time. It is widely accepted that communication constitutes the lifeblood of any organization and, therefore, any organization that experiences a breakdown in communication is not likely to live very long since numerous problems will arise that will ultimately cripple the organization and cause it to die (Carpentier 64). Therefore, according to Alper, Dean, and Kenneth, it is important that no effort be spared in resolving organizational conflicts and communication problems as soon as possible (636). Through proper communication skills, solutions can be found. This
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A number of communication rules have been proposed to improve problems solving. For example, McKay notes that one of the solutions to communication problems is acknowledging the interests and problems of others, avoiding name-calling, yelling, gossip, responding to a grievance with another complaint, and other unprofessional conduct. It is uncontested that good communication begins with listening. Communication is not about talking, interrupting, advising, criticizing, moralizing, arguing, or threatening. In fact, these are some of the antecedents of communication problems. Therefore, good listening is not only an effective solution to communication problems, but prevents such problems from occurring in the first place (Miller 837; Albert and Wolf 154). Similarly, Rehling notes that listening to others may be the most important solution to communication problems (482). She further posits that even though it may appear illogical, if everyone focused on truly listening, instead of talking, and responding strictly out of the listening context, communication between teams would be not only richer, but also more efficient and effective for problem solving. In view of the foregoing, Rehling argues that active listening precludes selfish interruptions and monologues, thereby providing a generic solution to the numerous communication problems

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