Relinquish Dbq Case Study

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In 1947, the British government was frustrated. They had spent significant time and resources trying to find an acceptable solution to their problems in Mandatory Palestine. Things were getting so bad that the British foreign secretary was quoted as saying “The Arabs, like the Jews, [had] refused to accept any of the compromise proposals which HMG had put before both parties.”1 Instead of a compromise, tensions were rising. Britain was facing an increase in Jewish terrorism, significant pressure from Arab elites, and a lack of support from other western powers.2 In respond to this, Britain decided to relinquish responsibility, officially passing their problem over to the United Nations on April 2, 1947. They requested that the UN form a …show more content…
Ben-Grunion felt that it was “the beginning, indeed more than the beginning, of [our] salvation.”15 On the other hand, the Arabs were markedly less enthusiastic. The secretary-general of the Arab League put it this way: “Up to the very last moment, and beyond, they [the Arabs] will fight to prevent you from establishing your State. In no circumstances will they agree to it.”16 It does appear as if the UNSCOP was swayed by the concerted Zionist efforts. The British felt that it was an unfair decision. However they had resolved to remove themselves from the situation, so they had little grounds to oppose it. As they saw it, the most likely solution would be a war, with the only UN involvement being to set up the initial …show more content…
A concerted lobbying effort followed, with the Zionists and Americans pushing hard for partisan support, and the Arabs trying to sink it. For much of this time it appeared as if the vote would fail, partially because the US diplomatic core refused to make threats. As the date of voting approached, the Zionist lobby began exerting more and more pressure. Finally, the day before the vote, President Truman gave the order to do whatever was necessary to ensure that the vote came out positive. This extra pressure pushed Haiti and the Philippines to switch their votes, and played a crucial role in ensuring that the General Assembly voted yes to the partition

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