Socrates View Of Justice In Plato's The Republic

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Starting The Republic, Book I, Socrates goes down to Piraeus (Plato 327a, p1). He is stopped by Polemarchus and begins the debate on what justice is with Cephalus (329a, p3). Cephalus explains his view of justice which Socrates shows is incorrect. Polemarchus, then, picks up where his father left off and looks to explain what justice is. However, unlike his father, Polemarchus explains justice as “friends owe something good to their friends, never something bad” (Plato, 332 a10, p6). Continuing with their debate, Thrasymachus becomes upset and suddenly exclaims that Socrates only questions (336c, p12). Socrates does not know an answer according to Thrasymachus (338b). Socrates is the one with the right answer. Thrasymachus belittles Socrates …show more content…
In this speech, Thrasymachus tells him that he thinks about rulers differently than sheep or cattle and whether it is advantageous for them (343b). “You are so far from understanding justice and what is just, and injustice and what is unjust, that you do not realize that justice is really the good of another, what is advantageous for the stronger and ruler, and harmful to the one who obeys and serves (343c).” Next, the son of Cephalus says that “...injustice rules the simpleminded…” (343c5). A just man, to Thrasymachus always gets less than the unjust one (343d). He continues on to say that injustice is better than justice (344c5-8). After which, he tries to leave, but is stopped by the others that are listening to the conversation. Socrates says that “...nonetheless, he does not persuade me that injustice is more profitable than justice (345a6).” The son of Cephalus, again, becomes upset and basically asks “Do I have to force feed you my argument for it to be convincing? (345b3-4)” After which, Socrates asks is rulers rule willingly (345e). Thrasymachus does not think it, rather he knows it (345e3). Again, Socrates pulls the crafts into his questioning to make sure Thrasymachus can see his point. He does and makes no more effort to give an explanation for what justice

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