Socrates Corrupting The Youth Analysis

Good Essays
Socrates is considered to be one of the greatest philosophers in not only the time of ancient Greece but one of the greatest in history. His philosophical views were seen as radical during his time and it eventually leads to the trial condemning him to his death. The Athenians were unjust in their conviction and condemnation of the death of Socrates. Socrates was accused of being impiety for not believing in the gods that the state believed in and corrupting the youth. His different views made him a criminal? That’s not right. Socrates is not corrupting youth with his teachings, people have their own free will to do what they want and it’s not his fault people want to follow his teachings. These charges did not fit the punishment he received …show more content…
Those who follow his teachings make their own decisions, and unfortunately, some of those followers acted against what the government sees as right. Socrates does not intend to create harm, it was not his fault and he cannot control the actions of others. But it doesn’t help that his teachings were associated with those who were corrupt. According to Michael Zuckert, “Socrates himself would not voluntarily corrupt others, because to do so is to make them harmful to their associates, and surely Socrates would not act to bring harm to himself. Socrates, like all men, seeks the good. If he and others embrace something other than the good, it cannot be because they voluntarily and willfully turn their backs on it” (Zuckert 228). It is also unjust because one of the accusers, Anytus whose son wanted to follow Socrates, did not allow his son to do so and so his son became an alcoholic. He blamed Socrates and used this as another example of Socrates corrupting the youth. Socrates was not corrupting the youth, but his teachings taught to question everything because you cannot be sure of anything. In the government's eyes, Socrates was starting some kind of movement by changing the way people perceived their lives and the way they perceived the gods. They unjustly accused him of crimes that did not fit the punishment given to him. Socrates’ was a good and wise man, but his teachings contradicted the Athens …show more content…
If he had not carried out his sentence, then justice would not have served. This would contradict his teachings and his actions. Even though Socrates opposed democracy, he went through with his punishment; death by poison. If he was really anti-democracy, he would have never agreed to a trial. “However, as opposed to Socrates the citizen who sometimes praises other regimes, ‘Socrates the philosopher desires democracy’.10 Indeed, within the discussion of the decline of the regimes Socrates is ‘actually engaged in a defense of democracy against its enemies the potential tyrants’, the timocratic Spartans.11” (Klonoski 11). The difference in views is what made Socrates a target of the democratic government, and even when his sentence was carried out, they didn’t want to get their hands dirty. Socrates was sentenced to death by poisoning, instead of trying to flee, he went through with it and accepted his fate. He died an innocent man but his philosophy will live

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    For Socrates knows that Simonides would not agree that a crazy man should be given his weapon back simply because the weapon belong to the man. Socrates knows that Simonides must have a motive for reasoning and must mean something else, something that maybe Socrates cannot understand. Polemarchus then tries to explain to Socrates that what Simonides really meant is that the friends should only do well to each other, and not hurt each other. So then Socrates questions Polermarchus again and asks him if that means that if Simonides also mean that you should do harm to your enemies. Polermarchus says that that’s exactly what Simonides means and again Socrates does not agree with this definition of justice.…

    • 1313 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Arguments Against Socrates

    • 1201 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Socrates argument In the apology book Socrates have many accusers. Now he is accused of corrupting the youth but He is denying the allegations he is saying that he could not intentionally corrupt anyone. Some people are convinced that he is speaking the truth but some people thing that he is lying. Socrates was teaching the youth not to believe in the gods that the city was believing in but he told them to believe other god not the one that they grew up believing in. Meletus is accussing socrate of corrupting the youth.…

    • 1201 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Cirto brings up the point that leaving his sons without a father is wrong, but Socrates reminds Crito that he would be doing worse by making his sons have a criminal for a father. Also he would be breaking everything Socrates stands for because he would break the social construct that he believed in, and become a hypocrite, by defying what he taught. By repaying evil with evil you are not achieving anything. This depicting how much Socrates focuses on being true to your moral values, and being ethical. Socrates also displayed his ability to question and not be so narrow minded.…

    • 1716 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Socrates Trial Case Study

    • 1127 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Carl: Sam, would you say that Socrates' trial was not fair because he was not guilty of the sentenced crimes? Sam: Well it was an extreme denunciation for such petty accusations. Carl: Since we agree that Socrates was wronged, I think Socrates was stoically accepting unjust Laws. He didn’t try to convince the jury of his innocence. Do you think Socrates did right by staying and facing death, or should he have escaped?…

    • 1127 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Socrates Reflection

    • 1813 Words
    • 8 Pages

    The philosopher starts his refute by saying that his reputation is associated with wisdom and this trait is seen as unlawful [Plato 22]. He who has wisdom and a sense of higher knowledge, should not be punished for it. All Philosopher who taught topics that are up in the clouds are charged with the same charges every single time [Plato 24]. As mentioned before, Socrates was seen as an evil-doer and a corrupter of the youth, but Socrates countered to the jury that Meletus is a doer of evil. He makes jokes about a serious matter and is too willing to take other men to trial on accounts of topics he has no interest in whatsoever [Plato 25].…

    • 1813 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In his mind, if there had been a more appropriate way to defend himself, Socrates’ daimon would have warned him away from the defense he employed. This type of thinking puts Socrates’ view of death into a unique perspective because he validates his assumption that death has to be a good thing, otherwise his daimon would have steered him a different direction. With the daimon’s assurance that he followed the right path, Socrates can safely assume that death is seen as a good thing’ either because he would have found peace in nothingness or he would have been able to continue his “mission” of bothering people in the afterlife (Plato). Although he was condemned, Socrates uses his daimon’s guidance to legitimize his actions in life because it endorsed a potential afterlife of similar actions. Choosing to emphasize this aspect near the end of the speech indicates an attempt to show the injustice of Socrates’ death because he was he was convicted in large part because of actions that the gods deemed…

    • 995 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Socrates defends his case for justice against Crito when Crito says he is being unjust by ruining him and his friends' reputations. Socrates believes that justice is not determined by the opinion of the majority. Crito explains to Socrates how he will ruin his reputation when he says, "Not only will I be deprived of a friend, the like of whom I shall never find again, but many people who do not know you or me very well will think that I could have saved you if I were willing to spend money, but I did not care to do so. Surely there can be no worse reputation than to be thought to value money more highly than one's friends, for the majority will not believe that you yourself were not willing to leave prison while we were eager for you to do so" (47). Crito is selfish by thinking about the majority's opinions rather than the big picture about justice and piety.…

    • 1066 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However as Weiss (1998) notes, the Laws focus on disobedience in the face of suffering and not disobedience as a form of protest against injustice. Without violent revolutions states can still change drastically over time to accommodate the needs of the society, which Socrates would surely see the necessity of this. The Laws do not reflect his views, but are a rhetorical device used by a philosopher who cares for his friends lawless soul (Weiss,…

    • 1161 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Resistance as a civic virtue Laws are not standard. They changes from state to state and obviously from country to country. Athenians judicial system condemned to death a man for having different beliefs than theirs and based in Apology and Crito by Plato in this essay I claim that Socrates’ acceptance of death under a failing judicial system is unvirtuous although he tries to picture it as a virtuous and civic act. His aberration for obeying the outcome of his trial becomes pointless because if he wants to be virtuous he must go against the system showing resistance. Socrates has to continue fighting back the unfair system that condemns him and convince others to join his cause Should we follow the many or the one?…

    • 1448 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    ‘The Apology’ written by Socrates most famous student Plato, is a Socrates dialogue where he is defending himself from the accusations of corrupting the youth and not believing in the gods of Athens. He tells the court that these accusations are false and he does believe in the gods of Athens. He also tells them that he did not corrupt the youth, in fact the youth followed him on their own free will. According to Socrates the problem was that people who called themselves wise were not actually very wise, their knowledge was based on ignorance thinking that they were wise and he wanted to help them see that true knowledge was knowing nothing rather than believing that they know everything. As philosophy is based on questioning everything, he…

    • 1048 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays