Socrates Horse And Gadfly Analysis

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Socrates then gives the notion of the horse and gadfly. This notion gives a better understanding of Socrates’ philosophical lifestyle. He compares it to his duty as a philosopher to the state. Socrates is the gadfly while the state is the horse. The gadfly stirs the horse; the gadfly is a bother to the horse but it can promote action. Socrates uses the dialectic to push people to increase their knowledge and wisdom. Whether they will continue the dialectic and pursue excellence is their choice. Like gadflies sting sluggish horses, Socrates awakens citizens from ignorant slumber through examination. The Apology also serves as a gadfly to the reader; we are pushed to examine our life and pursue the good. However, we should not wait or outright …show more content…
This is a fundamental concept to our everyday lives and Socrates’ meaning of life. Questioning one’s own life is essential, but so is aiding others by participating in the dialectic. In the end, there is no greater good than to discuss every day with each other about human excellence. Socrates himself was an example of that, many heard him arguing and examining others and himself. As a result, you will live a good life that involves human knowledge, excellence, and wisdom. But keep in mind that this understanding and answers will lead to a soul properly taken care of which is of utmost importance. This will also give you the ability to identify the good and eventually it will come naturally. Socrates expresses that to be the only creatures alive to be able to question and value life is a gift and we would cease to be human without it.
Lastly, Socrates brings up the concept of death. As we know, the state of the soul and living a harmonious and virtuous life is far more important than the physical life. Thus, to fear death is a guilty plea to living an ignorant and unjust life. There are two outcomes to death: positive transition and positive transformation of the soul. The soul can be in eternal rest or migrate to a better place. Contrary to belief, death is not an end but the beginning of an undisturbed rest. In summary, to be ignorant of death is to be cowardly,
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The reason why Socrates’ is such a renown philosopher is that he was both wise and had excellence. Only those who are wise and have excellence can teach but must remain students themselves. Teachers and students are equals, whose duty is to question for the benefit of both parties. Socrates proves that an open mind and ability to strive for excellence of the soul permits you to gain knowledge. Socrates, accused of corrupting the youth with these ideas, argued he was giving hope. His ideas did nothing but instill eagerness for the future in the youth so they can improve. The Apology is not only about Socrates defending himself; he is teaching others. He gives you a look at how to live a happy and just life that will, in turn, be give you peace in the afterlife. This is not only about an audience, this was also directed to his own accusers and judges. Socrates was humble enough to, in a way, warn them of their actions and how it would hurt them more in the end. The analysis of wisdom helps us understand life, while the concepts provide

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