Sociology Explain The Effects Of Assimilation In Canada

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Research Question: How does sociology explain the effects of immigration and assimilation in Canada?
Canada is known as one of most multicultural country in the world today. Aside from the Natives, everyone in Canada today is an immigrant or a descendant of immigrants. But when looking at Canada’s immigration history, you can easily learn that many ethnic groups had to assimilate when they moved to Canada. Not only did immigrants experienced assimilation, they also experienced marginalization and discrimination. Although assimilation is still present in today’s society, multiculturalism became the dominant ideology and an important value of Canadians. The effects of assimilation allowed Canada as a country to learn, develop and progress as a nation. Sociology explain the effects of immigration and assimilation of Canada because through the antiracism and functionalism theory, we can have a thorough understanding of how Canada assimilated and marginalized immigrants, the factors that led to the development of multiculturalism and lastly, how the effects of assimilation allowed Canada to develop.
To being with, when looking at Canada’s immigration history, you can easily learn that many ethnic groups went through many cultural barriers due to assimilation.
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It also attempts to create unity through differences and can help separate conflicting groups. It also makes our country democratic by providing the public with the rights of free speech. Therefore, functionalism can easily explain the importance of multiculturalism in Canada. Functionalists believe that if something exists in a society and persists over time, it must perform some necessary function that is important for the reproduction of the society. Functionalism also collapses when one part breaks down. Functionalism attempts to bring everyone together and create equality and that is also the purpose of

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