Karl Marx's Labeling Theory

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The first and most recognizable sociological theory we have discussed in class would be functionalism or to some structural functionalism. Emile Durkheim a French philosopher and sociologist is viewed as the founder of the “grand” sociological theory, though it should be noted Durkheim was heavily influenced by previous progressive social thinkers of his era such as Comte. Even so such a theory would ultimately be the most notable Macro level theoretical frame work following Karl Marx 's Conflict theory. As such Functionalism would direct its focus towards society in its totality. While recognizing that individual free will and choice were still very much at play, however a Functionalist would also be quick to point out that not every individual …show more content…
Labeling theory has been revised many times but perhaps the most significant revision attributed by the sociological community would be from Becker which helped redefine how this theory views those in power who promote a moral agenda, those who enforce this moral agenda and those who conform to it. This theory at its core reflects the existing social stratification within a society and how such a force dictates what is considered to be deviant. To that extent external forces on an internationalist level. And by virtue of this such a theory is therby Micro interns of how it focuses on personal interactions primarily between the rule enforcers and those that conform or deviate. It should also be noted that labeling theorists also identify that social stigmas develop in conjunction with social labels some may in fact be positive but more often times than not such a label is detrimental to a persons social development. One of two internalized conflicts is likely to develop of an individual branded by a negative social stigma. That person will either manifest the label to a greater extent. By that I mean some one branded a thief way view it as a tittle with merit and steal more. Or an individual will be falsely labeled for deviance despite having not been deviant and merely conforming to social norms or

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