Sociological Theories Of Socialisation

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Register to read the introduction… are learnt through socialisation. Socialisation is talking to other people. There are two types; primary socialisation which occurs in the family and is the first form of socialisation encountered, and secondary socialisation which progresses beyond the family in various social settings such as nursery, school, and work. Therefore, norms (how people are expected to behave) are created. People are expected to have the right values and beliefs. Values are things that we believe to be important. For example, someone may not think that trust is important when caring for people. Beliefs are what you think to be true, for example a belief there is life after death. People who do not conform to the norms are called deviant. People have a status which is how highly they are ranked within …show more content…
In England, the social classes where based on land ownerships given by the monarchy. The classes where… people with titles (e.g. earls) at the top, the church and clergy in the middle, and peasants at the bottom. However, this social stratification isn’t the same nowadays. Currently, class depends on wealth, age, gender, ethnicity and disability. In other countries such as the Indian class system, there would be no social mobility meaning that people at the bottom of the class system could not progress to the top. This meant that if you were born at the bottom, this is where you would stay. In England now, this is not the case as there are many stories of professionals and celebrities becoming wealthy and reaching the top of the class system after starting at the bottom. There are differences between different cultures. There can even be differences within the same culture (a way of life taking into account the values, beliefs, norms and traditions of the area/group of people). These differences can include age, gender, ethnicity, social caste and locality (where you live). These differences are collectively called social …show more content…
This is because society is constantly changing, for example, the proportions of the different types of family are changing (we are seeing a rise in the number of reconstituted families and a drop in the number of nuclear families due to the acceptance of divorce and remarriage). It is clear that changes can lead to confusion and chaos. This approach shows that other approaches cannot be used because they do not change with the ever-changing society. This approach has shown that the social institutions have separated leading to people making their own decisions and lifestyle choices, also due to more leisure and activities and consumer goods becoming available to

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