Socialism In Oliver Twist

2194 Words 9 Pages
The 19th century was an era of industrial changes throughout England, which changed the very foundation of families and children. With the increasing number of factories which opened their doors, cities were created and caused an influx of people to move into confined living spaces while contributing to lethal diseases. Most diseases were the consequences of excrement which was thrown out of windows, unwashed peasantry, and overpopulated places of residence. The streets of London were covered in excrement which caused cities to have a putrid smell of death as bacteria multiplied. Women were now given the opportunity to leave the home and work in dilapidated textile factories, allowing the possibility of a surge in a women’s rights movement. …show more content…
Children were never viewed as contemporary society views them, instead children were viewed as smaller adults with the expectation of becoming a person with a trade. Orphans were most especially expected to contribute in some form to society and were often ostracized for being the unwanted of England leaving each orphan in infamy in any realm of English Society. Charles Dickens embodied every aspect of the industrial revolution through his work, “Oliver Twist”, as he used his life experience and primary observations of life in the cities. His work depicts the social aspect of every class distinction while bringing great attention to the lives of children. In Roman Polanski’s film, Oliver Twist (2005), Polanski takes Charles Dickens’ original work and captures the key aspects of Dickens’ theme throughout the novel. Dickens purposefully evokes emotion throughout his literature in order for the reader to truly understand the life of a person living through such a revolutionary time in morality, values, technology, and family …show more content…
Many people living during the era were faced with the reality of possibly being left to die in homeless groups. “It was the very place for a homeless boy, who must die in the streets unless someone helped him” (Dickens 123). Oliver knew the reality in which if he were neglected he shall die, although this may relate to neglect and abuse, it is the cause of these notions that left the cities in retched conditions. With an overwhelming poor population, there exist the reality of a large death count from neglect which relates back to Federico’s article of the many deaths Oliver witnessed, and at one time, labored. This meant that more jobs were available and urged the population to grow within such villages to cause the growth of lethal bacteria. Although Dickens does not directly mention the growing number of deaths due to the growing disease, he does imply the likeliness of being sick. He constantly refers back to Oliver in several occasions as being sick and worn by sickness. His implications lead to the realization of how common it had become for a malnourished child to fall ill. Dickens then refers to a street where Mrs. Sowsberry passes through to depict the physical state of the city. “They walked on for some time through the most crowded and densely inhabited part of the town, and then striking down a narrow street more dirty and miserable than

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