The Social Support Theory

Improved Essays
updating them on the aspects of their illness brings the social worker to address the families also dealing with the health outcome. Even if it is not long term, the short term results of making a difference far outweigh doing nothing.
While there are an overwhelming number of benefits, there are some difficult aspects of being a mental health care manager, such as getting providers to communicate with each other. For example, a client might have been prescribed medications from different providers, that could have side effects when taken together. Since these providers don’t communicate with each other, the patient is now suffering. One of the duties of a social worker includes getting providers to communicate with each other so the patient
…show more content…
Many older adults no longer have children or grandchildren living in their homes to help them with personal care, which is why they rely on home care workers (Borst, 2010). The Social Support theory relates to people needed social support in order to have an improved health outcome, this is where the home care workers can provide that support to their clients. Some older adults are faced with health inequality, or unequal access to health care, due to ageism. Jennifer’s job is to make sure that each client gets equal treatment and equal access to health care because social workers promote social justice. Jennifer said many of her clients are experiencing liver problems, due to medications and substance abuse, congestive heart failure and diabetes. On the mental health care side, Jennifer said she finds patients are not living into their 80s or 90s, whether it be due to physical problems or effects of medications. On the economic side, Jennifer finds that around 78%-85% of clients are living in subsidized housing, where their main source of income is social security with some having a small pension. According to Borst (2010), aging adults are becoming victims of the health care system economically because medications and in-home care are extraordinarily high. This proves Jennifer’s findings that almost all the older adults she sees as clients are lower …show more content…
When discussing how the bio/psycho/social/spiritual perspective applies to the patient populations, Jennifer’s first response was stating how important this was because the job includes going into client’s homes. Biologically, Jennifer deals with discussing patient’s medical illnesses and how to better cope with the outcomes. The social workers gain an understanding on what the clients strengths are and base new medical plans on their strengths and what the clients want. Psychologically, patients may not be dealing with their illness properly and may need some counseling. Socially, Jennifer has a chance to check the environment the clients are living in which can tell a lot about the resources the clients will need or how to alter the way they are living. Spiritually, clients may have certain limitations regarding medications because specific medications may contain materials the client won’t eat. For example, if a client’s religion forbids them to eat meat, they cannot be prescribed a medication containing

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Terminal Suicide

    • 1310 Words
    • 5 Pages

    However, when a patient becomes hospitalized the hospital has new routines that work well for the hospital as a whole, but does not consider the needs of individualism. Terminal patients fear requiring help going to the bathroom and dealing with other aspects of daily care. Losing one’s self in the face of terminal diagnosis can be an incentive for requesting an assisted suicide (Gamondi et al., 2013). Requesting this is difficult, but losing one’s self is seen by many as unbearable. If assisted suicide was a choice for these people it would lessen the weighted down feeling that these patients have.…

    • 1310 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The information provided was useful for both the patient and the caregiver. It created a safety net for those to understand the importance for taking self-responsibility of their own health while providing questions the patient can ask. This would be ideal when teaching a patient about what questions can be appropriate to ask when obtaining new medications. Patients do not think of themselves as being responsible for their own healthcare needs. While no single intervention strategy can improve the adherence of all patients, decades of research shows that that successful attempts to make improve patient adherence depends on the fact of many key factors (Martin, Williams and Haskard-Zolnierek, 2010).…

    • 838 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Nursing Transition Theory

    • 1847 Words
    • 8 Pages

    If the nurse needs further assistance, she can get the social worker involved in getting the patient connected with the right resources that would assist him with a smooth transition from the hospital to the home. The social worker or care coordinator would contact the insurance company to obtain authorization for the services that patient would need once discharge. The patient will be visited at home by a nurse that would teach him about insulin self-injection. This example can be look like an effective transition from the hospital to home. In addition, the transition theory helps nurses to understand that effective transition is critical to the patient‘s safety to avoid lapse or gap in care.…

    • 1847 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Several studies have indicated that patients get inadequate information about their sickness and self-care while they are getting discharged from hospitals. The research studies showed that patients scored least satisfaction for patient education among other nursing care.Educating patient involves all informative activities related to the patient, family, health education, prevention, care, and cure.Hence, educating patient should be considered as a part of patient care, not as an separate activity (Farahani et al., 2013). Patients use Internet resources, sponsored by the government and private entities, to become more informed about illnessand health care. This makes nurses to be more competent in critical thinking, communicating, and teaching.Therefore…

    • 1142 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Health insurance companies are now starting to have nurses contact Doctors offices for follow up care to make sure their clients understand the physicians’ recommendations. The medical staff the first contact patients and it is our responsibilities to provide the best care possible to all. They can help make the patients feel more comfortable and willing to express their concerns and questions. After my mother passed, reading her medical records it was obvious that she had no idea of what was going on with her health. There was even documents that said that she seemed to be confused.…

    • 1249 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Information is transferred from the nursing home in the form of written notes and medication lists that are sent with the elderly patient when being admitted to the hospital. “The issues of interest in the study were: transfer and admission; discharge and return to nursing home; and improving collaboration and quality” (Kirsebom, Wadensten, & Hedstrom, 2013). Nurses in the nursing home setting find it sometimes hard to determine when a patient should be transferred to the hospital. A patient’s care plan should be kept up-to-date and followed. It is also important for family members to know and understand the care that’s being provided at the nursing home.…

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Role Of A Nurse

    • 1573 Words
    • 7 Pages

    His or her job as a nurse is to determine what is best for their patients. This would seem to be a doctor’s position, as it very much is, but often doctors unintentionally view patients as a medical chart with numbers and information, rather than a person with a family. Nurses spend the most amount of time with their patients; thus, they learn what makes a patient laugh or cry, and they understand their patients’ comfort levels so they work in a way to form relationships with each and every one they care for. Nurses save patients’ lives just as often as doctors. In order to save lives, nurses must be well equipped in the knowledge of medicine, human anatomy, and psychology.…

    • 1573 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    In other words, the objectives of biomedicine illustrate the practitioners’ depersonalized care of their patient. The professional healers would care for a patient just how they would care for any other patient. Since her mother was the one who nursed her back to health, her care was indeed more personalized than the care she would have obtained if Pinky was hospitalized. This exemplifies the contrasting objectives of two different professionals of biomedicine inside and outside the bureaucratic system. Therefore, the depersonalization of the patient’s experience demonstrates how the professional’s impersonal goals and a focus on efficiency are of interest in biomedicine.…

    • 1949 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Effective communication skills become very important when interacting with patients because many times they rely on nurses to be the mediator between themselves and other healthcare professionals when they are unsure of what is occurring. It is well known that patients use alternative medicines but many are reluctant to disclose this to practitioners. In being an effective listener and communicator with patients and their families, nurses are able to analyze their feelings, knowledge, thoughts, and problems and contribute to cultivating a therapeutic environment to answer questions in a way they are easily understood (Selimen & Andsoy, 2011). When patients feel their input is valued they are more inclined to disclose all relevant health information including their use of alternative treatment modalities to their treatment…

    • 1604 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In mental health nursing especially a relationship between the nurse and the patient is vital. It is the initial intervention to encourage knowledge and development and to support ben to get through problems which may arise. However, (Shattell, Starr and Thomas 2007) states that a therapeutic relationship for persons with mental illness requires in-depth personal knowledge, which is acquired only with time, understanding, and skill. Although therapeutic relationships are vital for patient improvements; it is said that good relationships between nurses and patient require skill from nurses which is learnt over time and not something you can just learn from the books. Another tricky position of therapeutic relationship is knowing how close to get to the patient; The relationship that blurs the boundaries between professionalism and friendship is…

    • 1785 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays