Essay Social Media's Negative Influences on Social Interaction

6708 Words May 5th, 2014 27 Pages
Does Social Media Positively or Negatively Influence Social Interactions? How Is Social Media Used as an External Attribution?
Stefan V. Salazar-McGovern
Capella University
Professor Pierre Nunez

Table of Contents
Abstract………………………………………….…………………………………………3
Introduction……………………………………….……………………………….……….4
Setting……………….…………………….……....……………………………….………6
Location Advantages……..…………….……………………..………………….7
Location Disadvantages………….………………………………………..……..8
How social psychology considers social media in this environment..……………….9
Research Methods………………………………………………………………………..11
Ethical Challenges………………………………………………………………………..12
Research Analysis………………………………………………………………………..13
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This case study will apply to the purposes of social psychology, as social psychology is defined as how people influence one another (Schneider, Gruman & Coutts, 2005). The twist that will appear in the research to follow is how not only people influence other people, but how their use of social media influences other people and their interactions with other people. It is the author’s hypothesis that the use of social media, although very useful at times, is devastating to normal face to face interaction. We are reminded of those people walking down the sidewalks with their heads buried into their cell phones, causing them to run into other people and obstacles on the sidewalk. The author also believes that this research will find that most, or all interactions that do exist, will occur through the use of social media instead of normal conversations.

Setting. The two different locations where this study will be held will be at a Starbucks coffee shop and a community college, both of which are located in Coalinga, CA. These locations were both chosen because they offer the author the best chance for naturalistic observation, or nonparticipant observation. Nonparticipant observation is defined as an observation made by a researcher that allows them to remain separate from the event being monitored, so they do not have to worry about affecting the results of their observations (Schneider, Gruman & Coutts,

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