Democracy Social Media Analysis

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The Role of Social Media in Enhancing Democratic Processes.

There are several roles social media can play that bring positive impacts to democratic processes. First, within the context of authoritarian regime, social media benefits ‘politically marginalized groups’ (Loader & Mercea, p. 765) to enforce democratization. It is important to be noted that internet does not only serve as a ‘medium’, but also ‘space’ (Papacharissi, 2010, p. 113). When authoritarian regime does not provide space for its people to actively participate in politics, social media can be an alternative space where activists discuss and manage their democracy movement.

The most obvious example of this might be Arab Spring event where social media played important role
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115). In this debate ‘cyber-enthusiast’ support the idea of social media as the medium of social change, on the other hand, ‘cyber-skeptics’ argues that internet averts people from real participation in social movement. Despite these different point of views, even though political movement in social media can not automatically establish democracy (Kyriakopoulou, 2011, p. 23-25), to entirely neglect the role of social media in democratization movement is not justifiable. Yiqit and Tarman (2013, p. 75) particularly underline the role of social media as the source of information, vehicle to raise awareness on democracy, and also communication tool to discuss ‘collective action’. Nevertheless, all of those opportunities created through social media only can bring impact when people respond by conducting real movement outside the internet, as Morozov saying, the “Tweets don’t overthrow governments; people do” (Morozov, 2010 in Kyriakopoulou, 2011, p. 25). As can be seen in the case of Arab Spring, social media is not the only factor that led the Arab revolution. Danju et. al (2012, p. 2) argues that social media served as ‘catalytic’ power to start the revolution. The same view is also pointed out by Lövheim (2013, p. 30) who argued that, even though, with regard to politics, social media has …show more content…
al., 2014), Squires (1998, in Loader & Mercea, 2011, p. 761) argues that, social media encourage ‘personal to become political’. Furthermore, Loader & Mercea (2011, p.759) states that social media empower citizens to be more active in analysing government policies and political situation as well as voice their opinion, instead of being ‘passive consumers’ of political actors and news in the mass media (Loader & Mercea, 2011, p. 759). This eventually lead to ‘participatory political culture’ (Loader & Mercea, p. 764) where people has more power according to the main principle of

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