Social Media And Celebrity Culture

1301 Words 6 Pages
The media has been around since the invention of the printing press in the 1400s. It became easier for information to spread all over Europe and then the world as the printing press spread to different parts of the world. The media began to change as new inventions—televisions, radios, and computers—were introduced to the general population. A different kind of culture was introduced to the world in the United States: celebrity culture. Celebrity culture is the general public passion with celebrity that grew in the country with the invention of motion pictures and the foundation of Hollywood. Our version of celebrity culture has changed since the invention of the internet and several social media sites such as Facebook and YouTube. The culture …show more content…
That person loves that actor or actress because of their acting, not their skin color or background. According to “Celebrity Culture,” the article says that “America’s obsession with celebrity has ultimately served to unite a diverse population across racial, gender, and economic lines” (“Celebrity Culture” 2). It’s apart of a “healthy democracy” as “Celebrity Culture” states in their article. It allows anyone to be “capable of being famous” and of “embracing the notion of equal opportunity for all” (“Celebrity Culture” 2). Everyone loves an actor or actress because of their work, not their skin color or background. From the culture outcome of the celebrity culture, comes the positive of people looking up at the …show more content…
Movies that tell actual tales of real life heroes are overdoing the action scenes, because they are editing in or out some key information about the person they are portraying. In “Too Many Celebrities, Not Enough Heroes”, Landon Jones says “The word ‘hero’ is on a steady down slope, while ‘celebrity’ is rising rapidly” (Jones 4). Our world is starting to shift the spotlight towards celebrities more than heroes. We are affected by those ‘small changes to save time or make the film more interesting. For instance, Sully is a film that tells the emergency landing on Hudson River by Captain Chesley Sullenberger—Tom Hanks played the captain in the film. The film generated controversy surrounding its depiction of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) as the ‘bad guys.’ According to Christine Negronia’s “‘Sully’ Is Latest Historical Film to Prompt Off-Screen Drama”, she managed to interview the NTSB investigators that investigated the landing. Robert Benzon, the retired leader of the investigation, said that they “weren’t out to hose the crew” (Negronia). The impact that the NTSB faces is huge as millions of mislead audiences protest them and say bad things about them. Of course, this mislead in films can target people. Concussion is another example of a film portraying someone as the bad guy. In Ken Belson 's "Dave Duerson’s Family Says ‘Concussion’ Film

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