Social Isolation In Frankenstein

Improved Essays
Mia Tiric
Mrs. King
Advanced Composition II 2016
Frankenstein: An Analysis of the Effects of Isolation and Alienation
Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein opens to a desolate landscape encompassed by cold and ice. The scene is quiet and bare, with few traces of life and little comfort. The region offers no solace or convalescence to its travellers, marking the beginning of the novel’s predicted calamity. The uninhabitable land of the Arctic Circle makes for an unimaginable home to most creatures, especially humans. But Shelley places men there, exploring and trekking across leagues of grim wasteland and snow, sailing into a storm searching for a plug for their curiosities.
She introduces us to the lonely character of Walton, and later on Victor Frankenstein and his virulent creation. These three forsaken bodies are the specimens Shelley uses to study the effects that isolation induces on human mentality and morality. Isolationism is a state or process in which persons, groups, or cultures lose or do not have communication with one another, often resulting in open conflict (“social isolation”). It is the absence of a like-bodied companionship--a wandering spirit devoid of another living, breathing soul. It’s the near complete lack of contact
…show more content…
The only time the monster and Victor are presented together with another being is at the very end, when Victor dies from the consequence of his secluded and shameful existence. Walton is the only character that witnesses the master and his creation standing side-by-side. Shelley does this on purpose, since Frankenstein’s and the monster’s development grows in

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Mary Shelley’s gothic novel Frankenstein portrays the theme of isolation and all its negative effects on the characters. The creature is most affected by alienation from society and a lack of community. No one throughout the creatures life shows him complete acceptance. The creature’s disfigurement further divides him from those around him and inhibits his desire to join society. The creature’s feelings of solitude and abandonment by Victor provide it with a vengeful goal and reason to live.…

    • 1232 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Frankenstein was looking for solitude in the valleys, but at the end of chapter 10 that state of being alone is destroyed by the cause of his sorrows. In chapters 11 and 12 we can see the isolation of the monster from society. Frankenstein’s monster realizes that he is different and that because of this he won’t be accepted by society. The monster finds a village and as soon as he walks in he felt the rejection. “The whole village was roused; some fled, some attacked me, until, grievously bruised by stones and many other missile weapons, I escaped to the other country.” The monster starts living by himself observing a family…

    • 753 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In fact, the novel Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, proves these theories of solitude to be true. In Frankenstein, Shelley paints the picture of a monster created by an isolated man, but no one cares for or loves the monster. The man, Victor Frankenstein, runs away from his monstrous creation and dedicates his life to finding and destroying it. However, the monster tells a different story, where he keeps himself in isolation and sadness because of every human’s scornful…

    • 1651 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Throughout his entire existence the monster had been isolated from humans, living in forests, the mountain, and the shed behind the De Lacy family’s cottage. Even though the monster is aware of how gruesome he is in appearance, he holds hope that people would make their judgements based on his inner nature (which he believes is kind) instead of basing their opinions on looks alone (103). Of course, he learned very quickly that this is not the nature of all humans, even though he wants to believe otherwise. Because he begins his life as a calm and somewhat sensible being, he is naïve enough in his relatively young age to believe that all beings feel the same. His creator didn’t stay around long enough to teach the monster the mechanics of the outside world or even give the creation a name.…

    • 1307 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The assonance in the quote creates a gradual melodic sound because of the way you say it, this adds to the sinister comparison. The comparison of him and the snowman displays his lack of compassion but also his intense loneliness. The snowman also reflects his cold state of mind. Another example of his cruel actions is how he “pours the goldfish down the bog”. He accomplishes this atrocious move on a vulnerable creature.…

    • 1150 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Al is another greasy bad character in this story that drove a motorcycle and seems to have mastered being evil. Al has walked down the path of evil to the point where he is dead, meanwhile our evil-in-training protagonist has the chance to meet him with the only difference is he is alive. The way this fateful encounter happened was that the narrator and his friends were running and attempting to hide from the other greasy characters that were trying to hurt them by going into the lake and using it as a cover under the woods and night sky. The protagonist realizes the “dead man rotating to expose a mossy beard and eyes as cold as the moon” (Boyle 286). A man that has lived the life of evil is dead floating around the cesspool of a lake.…

    • 1233 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Isolation is a very prominent theme in The Metamorphosis, Frankenstein, and Things Fall Apart. In these books, Kafka, Shelley, and Achinebe exploit the effects of isolation and alienation to portray the requirement of personal interaction and social inclusion for all humans. Franz Kafka seeks to uncover the potential dangers of social rejection through Gregor’s transformation, that ultimately leads to his separation from both his family and his past life. Kafka’s clear isolation of Gregor underlines the families’ separation from society. In The Metamorphosis, Kafka emphasizes Gregor’s seclusion from his family.…

    • 772 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Frankenstein by Mary Shelley is about a man, who through his love of science and alchemy, gives birth to a monstrous and forever unnamed creature. During the span of the novel, the monster goes either unnoticed by society or shunned, while Frankenstein lives his life in fear of coming upon the Creature or he is hunting him down. All the creature wants is what he notices the rest of society having; friends, family, community. At the very least, the Creature wanted a companion like himself, who could understand him and what he does through.The Creature’s abandonment by Frankenstein leads to his inability to enter society as a productive member and ultimately to the dissolution of Frankenstein’s friends and family and ultimately himself, as shown…

    • 802 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The gophers four emergency exits are comparable to the occupations Doc held for the community. Doc acted not only as a scientist, but as a medical doctor, a confidant, and a philosopher. Thus, making him irreplaceable to the Cannery Row community. Furthermore, Steinbeck’s continued use of “dug” suggests that Doc had created these occupations for himself in order to cement his place in the Cannery Row community. The gopher also made “his beautiful burrow in the beautiful place but no female ever came” (192).…

    • 931 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This type of isolation is best seen in Mary Shelley’s novel “Frankenstein” through the main character “Victor Frankenstein” ambitions/desires that have blinded him, the sickness of concealing the truth and the need to avenge which left him alone in the world. First and foremost, Victor’s ambitions and desires have deprived the character from realizing what greatness he already has in…

    • 1114 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays

Related Topics