Social Injustice In Healthcare

762 Words 4 Pages
In 2012, almost eight out of one thousand people died. In spite of that it seems like a negligible ratio, eight is a relatively great number if the rate is involved with death. Nations resort to effective healthcare to cut down this rate. Nevertheless, healthcare injustice is a vital complication that has not been solved till now. Martin Luther King said “of all forms of inequality, injustice in healthcare is the most shocking and the most inhumane.” Oxford Dictionary defines healthcare as “the maintenance and improvement of physical and mental health, especially by providing medical services; injustice is a lack of fairness or justice.” Healthcare injustice is a life-related social injustice that is universal, influential to several aspects …show more content…
Taking a look at developing countries, ninety percent of diseases happened in developing countries where less than 10% of their annual budgets were used for healthcare (Chudi 2010). In addition, even in the most advanced and wealthy country, more than 40 million American adults expressed their need for healthcare, but their demands were largely unfulfilled because they could not afford it (Fox 2007). Although they are on average the wealthiest people in the world, they could not receive effective healthcare without a universal healthcare system. If these people, who earn considerably highest salaries than people in other regions could not take it, there is no possibility for the publics in poorer countries to afford it. Thus, it is undeniable that injustice in healthcare is occurring universally in both developing countries and developed countries, although the acceptance of this fact is …show more content…
Some might say health care does not cause the deaths of people, but such statement cannot bear many refutations. The deaths caused by healthcare disparity not only happen to adults, but also to kids, who are the hopes of the future. Research conducted by Gates Foundation indicates that “annual death among children under age 5 was approximately 10 million in 2010.” Notwithstanding, if these kids can get timely and effective treatment or healthcare provided by a universal healthcare system, it is likely to heal them. For example, since 2000, malaria incidences have been diminished by up to half in 25 countries with universal medical services (Yamada 2010). A universal healthcare system can distribute medical services evenly to everyone and avoid healthcare injustice. Consequently, it is valid to say that injustice in healthcare cause avoidable deaths to the temporary generation, as well as the future

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