Social Impact Of Sex Trafficking

1057 Words 5 Pages
I broke this portion of my report up to study the real effects of both the victims and our communities (Montgomery Media News). When considering sex trafficking, it’s easy to name the impact it has on the victim. The victims are often stripped entirely of rights, freedom, and humanity. Women are beaten when they disobey the pimp or try to escape. There are countless reports of victims subjected to emotional abuse, in addition to physical battery and rape. This is the kind of harm that we, as outsiders, unfamiliar with the inner-workings of trafficking, can physically see. The less obvious impact is the one trafficking has on the community — both big American cities and small suburban towns. Most Americans don’t even believe trafficking is happening …show more content…
This does not denote them as being not a serious matter, nonetheless. Those who have truly experienced human trafficking are the ones who must cope with the majority of the social impacts like HIV and AIDS which can be spread because of human trafficking, and can affect any and all of the population. Since human trafficking often involves selling a person for sex, pregnancies would be expected. No matter, human traffickers have even found a way to make that seem dark and twisted. They force those who are pregnant to have abortions, with unclean instruments by noncertified practitioners. This lack of sanitation is one of the many factors in the ever spreading HIV in the human trafficking world. The relationship between human trafficking and HIV isn’t always completely obvious. Really, the fact that there was any relationship at all between these two problems is a recent …show more content…
Many states have adopted strict legislation to deal with the crime of sex trafficking. In Georgia (Atlanta Journal Constitution) convicted human traffickers would be forced to register as sex offenders and pay into a state fund for victims under two new bills under review in Georgia’s House. In combination with Senate Bill 8 and Senate Resolution 7 it would establish a new Safe Harbor for Sexually Exploited Children Fund, which would get money through new $2,500 fines on convicted traffickers and an annual $5,000 fee on adult entertainment establishments. That money would pay for healthcare, housing and other services for victims. SB 8 also mandates that convicted traffickers register as sex offenders. The bill is named the “Safe Harbor/Rachel’s Law Act”. Opponents in the House argued singling out strip clubs for new fees would set a bad precedent and do little or nothing to crack down on sex trafficking. They said much of the problem occurs through the Internet. Supporters condemned strip clubs, saying they contribute to the state’s

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