Social Gender Roles In Disney Movies

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Men and women all over the world have social gender roles they must play in our world. If one decides to challenge the concept, some consider this crazy and welcome some harsh criticism. Barbara Meltz points out, “A study of the most popular G-rated movies of the past 15 years has found that three-quarters of the characters are male, raising concerns that Hollywood is inadvertently telling children that women are less important than men.” However, there have been men and women who have successfully changed some of the stereotypical idea of gender roles. We see these stereotypical roles in our everyday lives from advertisement, movies, and multi-media. Disney movies are one of the biggest influences on young girls. In many of their early movies, Disney portrait the domestic views of females. Dawn Elizabeth England noted, “Disney films specifically have been shown to portray some stereotypical depictions of sex” (565). Over time, Disney began to try to change the gender views on women by making princesses braver and equal to their prince. England also observes, “The gendered messages did not …show more content…
By showing, young girls that they can take charge in a male dominated world. Chinese culture is very much like it is patriated in Mulan. As a young girl watching Mulan, I love the ideal her character made for girls like me to look up too. She is not a “girly girl.” Many other young girls idolize her because of that fact that she did not fit the princess role. . Like many of the earlier princesses such as Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Princess Jasmine, they had very strong views on how they should act. Mulan did not care as long as she was living her life and making her family proud of her. Her culture gender role did affect her by showing her that she must do and act a certain way in order to keep up with society. Gender roles are changing slowly in the world, to help make more of a fair world for men and

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